Author Topic: The slightly less well known  (Read 146099 times)

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Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #925 on: August 01, 2021, 07:19:16 PM »
CAC Winjeel

The CAC CA-25 Winjeel is a three-seat training aircraft from the 1950`s.

It was developed by CAC as a contender to RAAF technical requirement No.AC.77 issued in 1948. Designed to replace both the Tiger Moth and the CAC Wirraway, the first two prototype CA-22 aircraft were flown in February 1951.However, it proved a very stable aircraft making it almost impossible to spin, and with this being a required part of pilot training the tail had to be redesigned. The aircraft looks similar in many ways to the more powerful UK Percival Provost

The first CA-25 aircraft flew in February 1955, and deliveries began that September.The first Winjeel entered service with No. 1 Basic Flying Training School (1 BFTS) at Uranquinty.The last aircraft of 62 completed was delivered in August 1957. In most of its service life, the Winjeel was used as a basic trainer at RAAF Base Point Cook in Victoria, after 1 BFTS was transferred there in 1958. The Winjeel remained in service with the RAAF as a basic trainer until 1968, when the Macchi MB-326 replaced it in this role. The failure of the all jet concept ensured that the Winjeel was retained in the training role until 1975,when it was replaced by the New Zealand-built PAC CT/4A Airtrainer.

A few Winjeels were used in the Forward Air Control (FAC) role. Initially operated by No. 4 Flight, they were equipped with smoke bombs for target marking. By 1994 there were 4 in service with No. 76 Squadron but later that year they were replaced by the Pilatus PC-9 and subsequently retired. Some examples of the aircraft remain in flying condition in private ownership as well as museum displays around Australia.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2021, 10:12:50 AM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #926 on: August 15, 2021, 10:30:23 AM »
CAC Sabre

The CAC Sabre, or Avon Sabre or CA-27, is an Australian version of the North American Aviation F-86F Sabre fighter.

In 1951, CAC purchased a licence to build the F-86F Sabre. It was decided that the CA-27 would be powered by a licence-built version of the Rolls-Royce Avon R.A.7, rather than the GE J47.
In theory, the Avon was capable of more than double the maximum thrust and double the thrust-to-weight ratio of the US engine. This required a re-design of the fuselage, due to the Avon`s dimensions and lighter weight. Over 60 percent of the fuselage was altered and there was a 25 percent increase in the air intake size. Another big change was replacing the F-86F's six machine guns with two 30mm ADEN cannon, other changes were also made to the cockpit, and to provide an increase in fuel load.

The prototype ( CA-26 Sabre) first flew on 3 August 1953. Production aircraft were designated the CA-27 Sabre and first deliveries to the RAAF began in 1954. The first batch of aircraft were powered by the Avon 20 engine and were designated the Sabre Mk 30. Between 1957 and 1958 this batch had the wing slats removed and were redesignated Sabre Mk 31. These Sabres were supplemented by 20 new-build aircraft. The last batch were designated Sabre Mk 32 and used the Avon 26 engine, of which 69 were built up to 1961.

The RAAF operated the CA-27 from 1954 to 1971. From 1958 to 1960, CAC Sabres comprising 3 Sqn and 77 Sqn, undertook several ground attack sorties against communist insurgents during the Malayan Emergency. They remained in Malaysia at RMAF Butterworth (RAAF Butterworth). Armed with Sidewinder missiles, the Sabres were responsible for regional air defence during the Konfrontasi between Indonesia and Malaysia from 1963 until 1966.Between October and December 1965, a detachment of six Sabres, initially from 77 Sqn and later from 3 Sqn, was based at Labuan to conduct combat patrols over the Indonesian–Malaysian border on Borneo.

The last Sabres in Australian service, operated by No. 5 Operational Training Unit RAAF (5 OTU), were retired in July 1971.Former RAAF CAC Sabres were operated by the Royal Malaysian Air Force between 1969 and 1972. Due to better relations with Indonesia, 23 CAC Sabres were donated to the Indonesian Air Force  between 1973 and 1975, five were former Malaysian aircraft.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2021, 11:14:01 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #927 on: August 25, 2021, 10:44:49 PM »
Lasco Lascoter

The Lasco Lascoter was a 1920s 6-seat passenger and mail carrier aircraft. Just one example was built.

It was a high-wing monoplane with a steel tube structure, featuring a tailwheel undercarriage and an enclosed cabin for passengers and the pilot. It first flew on 25 May 1929.It was powered by a Armstrong Siddeley Puma piston engine of 240 hp  It received its Certificate of Airworthiness on 22 July 1929 and was put into service with Australian Aerial Services, an airline owned by Lasco, and used on an air mail route between Queensland and Daly Waters, Northern Territory. The Lascoter was used by Australian Aerial Services and its successors until being withdrawn from use in 1938 and later scrapped during World War II.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2021, 03:49:31 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #928 on: September 09, 2021, 05:53:21 PM »
Lasco Lascondor

The Lasco Lascondor was a 1930s Australian 8-seat passenger and mail carrier aircraft. It is claimed to be the first multi-engined aircraft designed and built in the Southern Hemisphere.

Development began in June 1928, concurrently with the company's Lascoter; the aircraft had 90% commonality of structural parts. It was a high-wing monoplane with a tubular steel structure, featuring a tailwheel undercarriage and a fully enclosed cabin for the passengers and the pilot. The main change was the three 150hp Armstrong Siddeley Mongoose engines instead of the Lascoter's single more powerful Siddeley Puma engine.
The Lascondor also had greater fuel capacity and a slightly longer fuselage with a larger cabin to accommodate an extra row of seats,also the Lascondor had only one set of flying controls to allow for another passenger seat, giving an overall capacity of seven passengers and one pilot.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2021, 05:55:16 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #929 on: September 11, 2021, 11:55:13 AM »
Transavia PL-12 Airtruk

The Transavia PL-12 Airtruk is a single-engine agricultural aircraft.

The Airtruk is a shoulder-wing strut braced aircraft built with an all-metal construction. The cockpit is mounted above a tractor-located opposed-cylinder air-cooled engine and stumpy fuselage with rear door. The engine cowling, rear fuselage and top decking are of fibreglass. It has a tricycle undercarriage, the main units of which are carried on the lower wings. It has twin tail booms with two unconnected tails. Its first flight was on 22 April 1965, and was certified on 10 February 1966. It was powered by 300 hp Rolls Royce Continental IO-520-D engine

It has a 1 tonne capacity hopper and is able to ferry two passengers. Other versions can be used as cargo, ambulance or aerial survey aircraft, and carry one passenger in the top deck and four in the lower deck.
In July 1978 an improved model, the T-300 Skyfarmer made it`s first flight, which was powered by a Textron Lycoming IO-540-engine. This was followed in 1981 by the T-300A with improved aerodynamics. Transavia ceased production of the T-300 in 1985.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2021, 12:28:42 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #930 on: September 19, 2021, 12:27:18 AM »
Tugan Gannet

The Tugan LJW7 Gannet,was a small twin-engined airliner from the 1930`s.

The Gannet was a strut-braced, high-wing monoplane, with twin de Havilland Gipsy Six 200 hp engines mounted on the wings. The undercarriage was a fixed tailwheel configuration with split main units. The wings were of wooden frames skinned in plywood, and the fuselage was built from welded steel covered in fabric.
The prototype Gannet began flight testing in October 1935, but was destroyed in a fatal crash shortly after. Despite this, the Gannet entered series production.

The type was operated by Butler Air Transport between Sydney and Broken Hill and one flew with Ansett Airways in 1943.It was the first Australian-designed and built aircraft to be taken on by the Royal Australian Air Force. RAAF Gannets saw service as survey aircraft between 1935 and 1942 when they were converted into air ambulances. The last RAAF Gannets were scrapped in 1946.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2021, 12:29:16 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #931 on: September 19, 2021, 03:32:44 PM »
Transavia PL-12 Airtruk

The Transavia PL-12 Airtruk is a single-engine agricultural aircraft.

The Airtruk is a shoulder-wing strut braced aircraft built with an all-metal construction. The cockpit is mounted above a tractor-located opposed-cylinder air-cooled engine and stumpy fuselage with rear door. The engine cowling, rear fuselage and top decking are of fibreglass. It has a tricycle undercarriage, the main units of which are carried on the lower wings. It has twin tail booms with two unconnected tails. Its first flight was on 22 April 1965, and was certified on 10 February 1966. It was powered by 300 hp Rolls Royce Continental IO-520-D engine

It has a 1 tonne capacity hopper and is able to ferry two passengers. Other versions can be used as cargo, ambulance or aerial survey aircraft, and carry one passenger in the top deck and four in the lower deck.
In July 1978 an improved model, the T-300 Skyfarmer made it`s first flight, which was powered by a Textron Lycoming IO-540-engine. This was followed in 1981 by the T-300A with improved aerodynamics. Transavia ceased production of the T-300 in 1985.
Puts me in mind of a mini Blackburn Beverly