Author Topic: The slightly less well known  (Read 180123 times)

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Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #950 on: January 30, 2022, 06:50:16 PM »
CKD-Praga E-51

The Praga E-51 was a reconnaissance aircraft and light bomber built in the late 1930s.

The twin-boom airplane project under Jaroslav Šlechta began in 1936 as a reply to a Ministry of National Defence specification which called for the design and construction of a new reconnaissance aircraft. The short-range reconnaissance three-seater was to be capable of monitoring activity behind enemy lines; the requirement highlighted the importance of excellent visibility from the cockpit as well as of placement of the on-board cameras. These were to be able to collect as many shots as possible, at as wide an angle as possible in one pass. The new aircraft was to replace the aging Letov Š-328 and Aero A-100. There were three entries to the tender: the Letov Š-50, the ČKD-Praga E-51 and the Aero A-304.

The E-51 was designed as a twin-boom twin-engine mid-wing aircraft with a central nacelle housing the cockpit and armament. The E-51 was Šlechta's first design based on such a configuration. Because the reconnaissance airplane had to be able to escape enemy fighters, a suitable engine had to be found. Šlechta considered three options: the inline Praga FR with an output of 355 hp, the inverted V-12 Walter Sagitta with an output of 500-600 hp, and the radial 9-cylinder Avia Rk.17 of 355 hp. As Praga's FR had not been finished yet and the Rk.17 was not powerful enough, Šlechta opted for the Sagitta. It was the first and only implementation of the Czechoslovak engine by Walter Aircraft Engines in a Czechoslovak airplane.

The simple wood and welded steel-tubes frame made both assembly and maintenance straight forward, and operation as well. The durability of the skin allowed for outdoor storage while on duty.
The aircraft first flew on 26th May 1938.The design is said to precede that of the Fokker G.I, a more well-known example of the same design configuration, which unlike the E-51, actually entered service.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2022, 06:55:43 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #951 on: February 06, 2022, 12:25:17 AM »
CKD-Praga E-210

The Praga E-210 was a four-seat, twin-engined touring aircraft built in the late 1930s.

The Praga E-210 was designed as a four-seat tourer or air-taxi. It appeared in public for the first time at the Paris Exhibition of late 1936, although it is not known whether it had made its first flight at that point. It was a high wing cantilever monoplane, with an enclosed cabin for four ahead of the wing and in 1936 a conventional tailwheel fixed undercarriage and single fin.
It was unusual in adopting a pusher configuration, with two engines close to the fuselage driving small propellers.

The wing of the E-210 was in a single piece, a wooden structure built around two spars and plywood. The leading edge was swept, however the trailing edge was straight. The ailerons were steel framed and fabric covered. Between them and the engines were Schrenk type landing flaps.The 85/95 hp Walter Minor four cylinder inverted in line engines were cantilevered from the rear spar on steel frames, with fairings both above and below the wings. The cabin sat forward of the leading edge, providing good visibility, and seated four in two rows, the front seats having dual control. There was a baggage compartment behind the rear seats, accessible from inside.

The exact first flight date is  unknown, but by the July 1937 Prague Aero Show it had been flying long enough for a directional control problem led to the revised fuselage to have been both being addressed. A report from March 1939 which said that the E-210 was then in production, though March was also the month of the German occupation of Czechoslovakia, so it is not clear if any further aircraft were completed. If so, they or the prototype may have been used by the occupying forces as transports, or as Army Co-Operation machines.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2022, 12:27:51 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #952 on: February 12, 2022, 12:03:19 PM »
CKD-Praga BH-41/E-241

The Praga BH-41 was a military advanced trainer aircraft produced during the 1930s.

It was a conventional biplane design with unstaggered two-bay wings of equal span. The pilot and instructor sat in tandem open cockpits, and the fixed tailskid undercarriage featured divided main units. The powerplant had been specified by the government to be the 300hp Hispano-Suiza 8Fb which were then being built under licence by Škoda.

A contract for 43 aircraft was signed. In 1936, a BH-41 was fitted with a 360hp Walter Pollux II engine, and was designated the E-241. Following successful trials, an order was placed for another batch of aircraft, this time for 95 machines fitted with the more powerful engine.
The aircraft continued service in the Slovak–Hungarian War and into the World War II, when around 30 E-241s saw service with the Slovak Air Force against the Soviet Union together with the German Luftwaffe.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2022, 12:30:52 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #953 on: February 21, 2022, 03:32:43 PM »
InterPlane Griffon

The InterPlane Griffon is a single seat, high wing, single engine, tricycle gear ultralight aircraft from the 1990`s.

The Griffon was designed to meet the US FAR 103 Ultralight Vehicles category, including that category's maximum 254 lb (115 kg) empty weight.
The airframe is built from aluminum tubing, with the wings and tail covered with doped aircraft fabric. The wing is supported by a "V" strut and utilizes jury struts. It features a three tube tail that allows the pusher propeller to be located in between the tail booms. Standard features supplied included brakes, electric starting, wheel pants, elevator trim system and a plastic cockpit pod fairing with a windshield. The wings and tail surfaces can be folded for trailering or storage.

Various engines could be used including the 40hp Rotax 447 and the 50hp Rotax 503, cruising speed was a leisurely 60mph.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2022, 03:33:49 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #954 on: March 04, 2022, 03:42:34 PM »
InterPlane Skyboy

The InterPlane Skyboy is a two-seat, side-by-side, high wing, single engine, pusher configuration ultralight aircraft.

It has a very similar construction to the single seat Griffon. The fuselage is built upon an aluminum main tube that runs from the tail right to the rudder pedals. The cabin is constructed from two fibreglass shells, joined together. The rear of the cabin is covered in aircraft fabric. The optional cabin doors open upwards to greatly improve access.
The Skyboy was designed in 1992 specifically for the German market as a trainer. It was later adapted for the US FAR 103 Ultralight Vehicles category for use as a two-seat trainer under the FAR 103 trainer exemption.

Available engines include the 64 hp Rotax 582, 80 hp Rotax 912, 100 hp Rotax 912S and the 85 hp Jabiru 2200. It was only available as a factory-complete, ready-to-fly product.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2022, 03:43:26 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #955 on: March 08, 2022, 11:19:00 PM »
Let-Mont Piper UL and Let-Mont Tulak

The Let-Mont Piper UL is a Czech microlight aircraft from the 1990`s.

The aircraft was designed to comply with the European Fédération Aéronautique Internationale microlight category, including the category's maximum gross weight of 450 kg. It was also marketed in the USA as a kit only for the US homebuilt market.
The Piper UL is based on early Piper Aircraft designs, such as the Piper PA-15 Vagabond. It features a strut-braced high-wing, a two-seats-side-by-side in an enclosed cockpit accessed via doors, fixed landing gear with wheel spats and a single engine in tractor configuration, usually a 50hp Rotax 503 twin cylinder, air-cooled, two stroke.
The fuselage is made from welded steel tubing, with the whole aircraft covered in doped fabric. By 1998 the company reported that 25 aircraft were completed and flying.

The similar Tulak features a strut-braced high-wing, but with two-seats-in-side-by-side configuration and a fully enclosed cockpit accessed via doors.It used the same 50hp engine as the UL, or a 80 hp Rotax 912 four-stroke powerplant.It features a squared off vertical stabilizer instead of the rounded off type fitted to the UL aircraft.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2022, 12:44:20 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #956 on: March 20, 2022, 11:21:05 AM »
Škoda-Kauba SK 257

The Škoda-Kauba Sk 257 was a light fighter/trainer monoplane built for the Luftwaffe in 1942/1943

Škoda-Kauba had produced the Škoda-Kauba V4 as a lightweight single-seat low-wing cantilever monoplane powered by a 240 hp Argus As 10C-3 engine with a retractable tailwheel landing gear. The first prototype proved very fast and agile despite its low power. Two more included a number of changes and, despite increased power, performance was not as good.

Potential for development was recognized and the Germans ordered four prototypes of an enlarged aircraft with a more powerful 485 hp Argus As 410 engine and allocated the designation Sk 257.The four prototypes performed well in flight testing and the type was ordered into production. However build quality of the prototypes did not pass the Luftwaffe control inspections and after only five production aircraft had been built the order was cancelled.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2022, 11:21:24 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #957 on: April 18, 2022, 05:05:37 PM »
Austria and Hungary now....

The Lloyd Series 44/ C1

It was a 2 crew multi-role aircraft which was used pre-WW1 for flight demo`s and then later as a recon and light bomber aircraft.
These first aircraft were made of wood and covered with canvas, with the exception of the 40.01, which had a steel tube fuselage.The engineers at the Lloyd factory used the experience of the first war to produce two versions of the 44 series, the second differed from the first in that instead of the previous canvas wing covering, the entire surface of the wings was covered with a thin layer of wooden sheeting, increasing the stiffness of the wing, and the surface smoothness, resulting in higher speed.

The Series 46, produced in 1917, was a completely revised new type. The Lloyd, was fitted with a plywood cowling and was now powered by a 185 hp MÁG Daimler engine (this aircraft was also the first version of the two-seat fast-flyer). Given the success of the revised aircraft, the Flieger-Arsenal in Vienna ordered the production of the Hungarian-designed (Series 82) type. This type was later fitted with 220 hp engines from the MARTA factory in Arad and was equipped with both forward and rearward firing machine guns.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2022, 11:35:54 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #958 on: April 26, 2022, 11:47:13 AM »
Aviatik (Berg) D.I

The Aviatik (Berg) D.I, was a single-engine, single-seater biplane fighter.
It was developed and manufactured by the Austro-Hungarian branch of German aircraft company Aviatik. It was also known as Berg D.I or Berg Fighter, as it was designed by Dipl. Ing. Julius von Berg, and to also to distinguish it from the D.I fighter built by the parent Aviatik firm in Germany.

The D.I was manufactured both in-house and under license by a number of subcontractors. The Austrian branch of Aviatik was responsible for producing the 38, 138, 238 and 338 Series.
The first digit represented the manufacturer, then a 'type number', which would be followed by a break and addition numbers of identify the individual fighters.

The main differences between the different series was in the power output of Austro-Daimler engines, 185 hp in the early production aircraft, 200 or 210 hp in the mid-production, and 225 hp in the last batches. Other changes included the positioning of the machine guns, as well as various structural alterations and refinements to the radiator and cooling system.

By 31 October 1918, 677 Aviatik (Berg) D.I airframes of all batches had been handed over to the Austro-Hungarian Imperial and Royal Aviation Forces.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2022, 11:48:28 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #959 on: May 15, 2022, 02:37:18 PM »
Lohner Type AA

The Lohner Type AA or Lohner 10.20, series,were a range of prototype fighters built during World War I.

In 1916 Lohner-Werke was given a contract to design and build a single seat fighter based around the 185 hp Austro-Daimler six-cylinder inline engine. The first airframe, serial number 111.01, and on 5 September 1916 the Lohner 10.20 was unveiled.It was a single-bay biplane with equal-span wings and I-type struts. The empennage incorporated a conventional horizontal stabilizer with no vertical stabilizer and a short all-moving rudder. The fuselage was short and deep with a laminated wood construction, armed with twin synchronized Schwarzlose machine guns.

During taxi trials, poor yaw control was reported with a tendency to "swap ends". A larger rudder was installed and the fuselage lengthened by 4ft. The Lohner 10.20 first flew on 29 December 1916 and was found to be unstable. Further test flights followed and the prototype was severely damaged when it crashed in February 1917.
After repairs and extensive modification were completed the aircraft was referred to as the Lohner 10.20A, the fuselage was again lengthened to 20 ft 10in, the I type struts were replaced with more common twin struts with wire braces. The tail was completely redesigned with a fixed vertical fin and an even larger rudder. Flight testing of the 10.20A continued until 6 June 1917, when it was totally destroyed in another crash.

Due to the poor performance, further development was halted after only 4 prototypes had flown, and the Luftfahrttruppen assigned Lohner-Werke a licence to produce the Aviatik (Berg) D.I.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2022, 02:39:32 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #960 on: May 31, 2022, 08:37:37 PM »
Lohner B.II

The Lohner B.II was a military reconnaissance aircraft produced in Austria-Hungary during World War I.

The aircraft was intended to perform in the terrain of the Austrian alps, it featured a longer fuselage, greater wingspan, and strengthened undercarriage.The Type B's Austro-Daimler engine was changed for a Hiero with slightly less power but was much lighter. The extended wingspan soon led to problems, however, when the prototype's wings collapsed under stress testing.

A second prototype, with strengthened wings, was accepted by the Army in August 1913, who placed an order for another 24 aircraft. Shortly after deliveries began, the wings of a Type C failed in flight, and all examples were grounded. Work to reinforce the wing design was carried out but this was not yet complete when war broke out. Six Type Cs were quickly put back into action, with the grounding of the rest was lifted shortly afterwards. The design proved too slow and too fragile for operational service, and was reassigned to secondary roles. Later in 1915, a new and strengthened wing was fitted to all remaining B.IIs, and the B.II (along with the B.I) was put back into production under licence at Flugzeugwerk Fischamend for use as trainers.

As the year drew on, the B.III, B.IV, B.V, and B.VI followed, featuring a variety of engines. None were produced in quantity,
« Last Edit: May 31, 2022, 08:39:25 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #961 on: June 29, 2022, 06:21:25 PM »
Lohner B.VII

The unarmed Lohner B.VII and its armed version the C.I, were military reconnaissance aircraft produced in Austria-Hungary during World War I.
Like their predecessors, the B.VII and C.I were conventional biplanes with characteristic swept-back wings. Power came from a 150HP Austro-Daimler engine.

The B.VII first appeared in August 1915 and at last provided an aircraft suitable for service use. They were used to conduct long-range reconnaissance missions over the Italian Front, as well as a small number of bombing raids, carrying 180 lb of bombs internally. Many B.VIIs in service were equipped with machine guns on flexible mounts for the observer, and this led to the armed C.I version being produced at both the Lohner and Ufag factories. The C.I also featured a streamlined engine cowling, whereas the B-types had their cylinders exposed.
Production of all versions ceased in 1917, and all were withdrawn from service.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2022, 06:23:31 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #962 on: July 02, 2022, 04:54:14 PM »
Lohner L

The Lohner L was a reconnaissance flying boat from Austria-Hungary during World War I.

It was a two-bay biplane of typical configuration with its pusher engine mounted on struts in the interplane gap. The pilot and observer sat side by side in an open cockpit, and both the upper and lower sets of wings featured sweepback. The design was a development of the Lohner E, and became highly influential, the L provided the basis for designs by other major manufacturers.
In Germany, Hansa-Brandenburg manufactured a modified version as their first flying boat, the Brandenburg FB [de], and in Italy, a captured example was used as a copy aircraft by Macchi, who produced it as the L.1. A restored example of an Austro-Hungarian Lohner L (serial L.127) is preserved at the Italian Air Force Museum at Vigna di Valle.
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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #963 on: July 22, 2022, 08:04:35 PM »
Ufag C.I

The UFAG C.I was a military reconnaissance aircraft produced during World War I.

The aircraft was a late arrival to the conflict, as it was introduced in April 1918, and was widely used on the Italian Front in the final months of the war.
It incorporated the best features of the Brandenburg C.II(U) on which it was partly based, with single-bay wings and 'I' strut inter-plane bracing, which replaced wing conventional steel-tube interplane struts in production aircraft. More manoeuvrable than the Phönix C.I, the C.I had good performance, but suffered from a few odd handling characteristics.

The aircraft was powered by a 230hp  Hiero 6 water-cooled in-line piston engine,driving a two bladed fixed pitch prop.It could be armed with machine guns, one fixed forward firing, and another from a rear cockpit mounting. It could also carry a small bomb load of up to 12 x 26lb bombs.It was used after WW1 by Yugoslavia and Romania
« Last Edit: July 22, 2022, 08:05:37 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #964 on: July 24, 2022, 01:14:41 PM »
Etrich Taube

The Etrich Taube, also known by various names from later manufacturers who built versions of the type, was a pre-World War I monoplane aircraft.

The Taube (Dove) was very popular prior to the First World War, and it was also used by the air forces of Italy and Austria-Hungary. Even the Royal Naval Air Service operated at least one Taube in 1912. On 1 November 1911, Giulio Gavotti, an Italian aviator, dropped the world's first aerial bomb from his Taube monoplane over the Ain Zara oasis in Libya.

The Taube was designed in 1909 by Igo Etrich of Austria-Hungary, and first flew in 1910. It was licensed for serial production by Lohner-Werke in Austria and by Edmund Rumpler in Germany.
The unique wing form was not modeled after a dove, but was copied from the seeds of Alsomitra macrocarpa, which may glide long distances from their parent tree. Etrich had tried to build a flying wing aircraft based on the Zanonia wing shape, but the more conventional Taube type, with tail surfaces, was much more successful.

Like many contemporary aircraft, especially monoplanes, the Taube used wing warping rather than ailerons for lateral (roll) control, and also warped the rear half of the stabilizer to function as the elevator. Only the vertical, twinned triangular rudder surfaces were usually hinged.The design provided for very stable flight, which made it extremely suitable for observation. The translucent wings made it difficult for ground observers to detect a Taube at an altitude above 400 meters. Due to the lack of licence fees, 14 companies built a large number of variations of the initial design.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2022, 01:15:03 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #965 on: July 29, 2022, 04:29:03 PM »
Etrich Luft-Limousine

The Luft-Limousine or Luftlimousine, was a single engine monoplane built in 1912.

It had a slightly bizzarre appearance with a birdlike tail, and a cabin for one pilot and a single passenger that was enclosed with wire gauze and celluloid windows, the reason for which Igo Etrich named it Luft-Limousine. The Luft-Limousine was the first military monoplane with an enclosed cabin. It was powered by a 60 hp Austro-Daimler engine.
It first flew in May 1912 and was later used in WW1 by the Austro-Hungarian army,altough just two aircraft were completed.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2022, 04:34:16 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #966 on: July 29, 2022, 05:07:39 PM »
Now Belgium...

ACAZ T.2

The ACAZ T.1 and T.2, very similar to each other, were the first Belgian all-metal aircraft, flown in 1924. They were single-engined touring monoplanes which seated two. Only two were built.
The first example of ACAZ's all-metal two-seater tourer, registered as the ACAZ T.1 O-BAFK, was first flew in early 1924. It was the first Belgian all-metal aircraft. Its trials went well and on 21 June it was flown to Brussels to take part in a touring aircraft contest, but in low cloud it collided with a tree and crashed; luckily no one was killed.

The ACAZ T.2, was noted as of the same type. It had made several successful flights by mid-July, just a few weeks after the crash of the T.1, though it was only registered as O-BAFM on 19 December 1924.
The engine was a (70 hp) Anzani 6, a six-cylinder radial engine mounted uncowled on the nose with its fuel tank behind a firewall. The fuselage was rectangular in cross-section, apart from a slightly shaped roof and was built around frames and longerons with sheet metal covering. The enclosed cabin, which held two sitting side-by-side, was under the wing and had both forward and side glazing. The fuselage frame in the cabin region was strengthened; access was via a side door.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2022, 05:07:58 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #967 on: August 07, 2022, 02:18:46 PM »
ACAZ C.2

The ACAZ C.2, was a prototype Belgian biplane fighter aircraft built in the 1920s.

It was an advanced design at the time, being built entirely of Duralumin metal and it made it`s first flight in 1926. It was a conventional biplane construction, the C.2, registered as OO-AFX, had one unusual feature - all four of its wings were identical and interchangeable. The aircraft also included space for cameras, allowing it to be used for photo-reconnaissance.
It was evaluated by the Belgian Air Force, but no orders were placed. The sole prototype was written off in a crash on 25 January 1933.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2022, 02:19:09 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #968 on: August 14, 2022, 11:54:33 PM »
Avions Fairey

The Fairey Aviation Company's Belgian subsidiary, was established in 1930–1 to produce Fairey Fox and Firefly aircraft for the Belgian Air Force.

The first Fox IIs entered service with the Belgian Air Force in early 1932 as a reconnaissance aircraft. The Fox continued in production at Avions Fairey for much of the 1930s, forming the backbone of the Belgian Air Force, being used as reconnaissance, reconnaissance-bomber and two-seater fighters. Later aircraft were fitted with enclosed canopies and more powerful 850hp Hispano-Suiza 12Y engines.
Over 100 Foxes were still in front-line service with the Belgian Air Force at the time of the German invasion on 10 May 1940.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 11:23:10 AM by Angry Turnip »