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Author Topic: The slightly less well known  (Read 34566 times)

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Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #200 on: July 26, 2019, 09:42:19 PM »
Dewoitine D.30

The Dewoitine D.30 was a ten-seat cantilever monoplane built in France in 1930.It first appeared in public at the Paris Aero Show in December 1930.It was a single-engine, ten-seat passenger aircraft with a high cantilever wing and rectangular-section fuselage.
It was powered by a 650 hp Hispano-Suiza 12Nbr water cooled, upright V-12 engine.This engine cowling followed the profile of the two cylinder banks, and drove a two-blade propeller;it was cooled with a Lamblin radiator mounted ventrally at its rear.

The D.30 first flew on 21 May 1931.A second prototype followed but was modified into a trimotor aircraft, designated the Dewoitine D.31 and powered by three Hispano-Suiza 9Q nine-cylinder radial engines.The outer engines were each mounted well below the wing via pairs of struts. Apart from the three engines and a consequent increase in weight and slight reduction in length, the D.31 was very similar to the D.30.
It first flew on 12 January 1932, initially powered by the 230 hp 9Qa engine variant,but in 1935 these were replaced by 320 hp 9Qbs.The outer engines remained uncowled but the central one had a long chord cowling.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2019, 09:42:39 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #201 on: July 27, 2019, 03:15:53 PM »
Dewoitine D.500 Series

The Dewoitine D.500 was an all-metal, open-cockpit, fixed-undercarriage monoplane fighter aircraft designed and produced in France.
On 18 June 1932, the prototype performed its first flight.During November 1933, an initial quantity of sixty aircraft was ordered on behalf of the French Air Force, for whom the type was to serve as a replacement for the Nieuport 62. On 29 November 1934, the first production D.500 made its first flight.

Aircraft armed with a pair of twin nose-mounted machine guns were designated as D.500 while those fitted with a single 20 mm cannon that fired through the propeller hub received the designation D.501.The most significant derivative of the type was the D.510, the main difference was the use of a more powerful Hispano-Suiza 12Ycrs engine,of 860 hp; minor refinements included a slightly lengthened nose, an increase in fuel capacity and a refined undercarriage arrangement.
A total of 381 D.500s and its derivatives were built by the end of production.The design was further developed into the more capable Dewoitine D.520, which featured an enclosed cockpit and a retractable undercarriage.

During July 1935, the initial models of the aircraft, the D.500 and D.501, were inducted into the Armée de l'Air.During October 1936, the first examples of the more powerful D.510 variant were also delivered.By September 1939,the early D.500/501 models had been relegated to regional defense and training squadrons.
Fourteen D.501s (named D.501L), originally sold to Lithuania, and two D.510s ostensibly intended for the Emirate of Hedjaz, saw service with the Republican forces during the Spanish Civil War, arriving some time during mid-1936. When the French government found out about the delivery of the D.510s, they demanded the return of the 12Y engines.The Russians had already copied it as the Klimov M-100 engine.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2019, 03:36:16 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #202 on: July 28, 2019, 03:53:26 PM »
Dewoitine D.770

The Dewoitine D.770 was a prototype French twin-engined attack aircraft of the late 1930s.

In August 1937,the French Air Ministry requested designs for a light attack bomber.SNCAM, the nationalised Dewoitine company, proposed a three-seater twin-engined aircraft to meet this requirement, with two prototypes being ordered,the Dewoitine D.770 to be powered by two Hispano-Suiza 12Y V12 engines,and the Dewoitine D.771 to be powered by two Gnome-Rhône 14N radial engines but otherwise similar to the D.770.

The prototype D.770 was completed at SNCAM's Toulouse factory in the spring of 1939.It was a mid-winged cantilever monoplane of stressed skin all-metal construction, with a monocoque fuselage and a retractable tailwheel undercarriage. A 20-mm cannon and two 7.5 mm machine guns were mounted in the aircraft's nose, and could be moved to an angle of -15 degrees aimed by the pilot. A single machine gun was flexibly mounted in the dorsal position, with two more machine guns in a ventral position, while eight 50 kg (110 lb) bombs could be carried in a bomb-bay.The crew of three were protected by armour plating.

The D.770 made its first flight on 27 June 1939,the aircraft demonstrated good speed,but it suffered from engine cooling problems and poor stability,testing was slow, and was not complete in June 1940 when the French surrender resulting in the test programme being abandoned.The D.771 version was completed in December 1939,but never flew, as the French Air Force favoured other types,and SNCAM were flat out producing the Dewoitine D.520 fighter. Both prototypes were scrapped in 1941.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2019, 03:54:07 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #203 on: July 29, 2019, 07:13:51 PM »
Dewoitine HD.730

The Dewoitine HD.730 was a prototype French reconnaissance floatplane of the 1940s.It was a single-engined, low-wing monoplane designed to be catapult-launched from warships of the French Navy.
Two prototypes ordered in 1938,it was a low-wing monoplane of all-metal stressed-skin construction. It was fitted with an inverted gull-wing, which folded immediately outboard of the twin floats to aid storage onboard ship, and it had twin tail fins.The two-man crew or pilot and observer sat in tandem under an enclosed canopy.
The observer could operate a single flexibly mounted machine gun and a fixed machine gun was operated by the pilot.The aircraft was powered by a single 220 hp Renault 6Q inverted six-cylinder air-cooled piston engine driving a two-blade propeller.Cruise speed was a sluggish 140mph and range was around 840 miles.

The first prototype flew in February 1940, with the second following in May.Testing showed that it was underpowered,it was proposed that the planned 40 production aircraft would be use a 350 hp Béarn 6D powerplant. These plans were stopped by the French surrender in June 1940, with the two prototypes being stored.
Despite the Armistice, development continued, with a significantly revised third prototype being built,to avoid Axis controls on the production of military aircraft, it was officially described as a commercial liaison aircraft for use in France's overseas colonies.
It made its maiden flight on 11 March 1941,but testing revealed that its wings were too small and the HD.731 was abandoned.Work on the HD.730 restarted on 21 July 1945. Testing was successful,but the French Navy now had no need for a catapult floatplane, as catapults had been removed from its ships,so the project was abandoned.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #204 on: July 30, 2019, 06:04:15 PM »
Donnet-Denhaut Flying Boat series

The Donnet-Denhaut flying boat was a maritime patrol and anti-submarine warfare aircraft produced in France during the First World War. Known simply as "Donnet-Denhaut" or "DD" flying boats, the DD-2, DD-8, DD-9, and DD-10 designations were applied to denote the various changes in configuration made during their service life.

The aircraft were developed in response to a French Navy request,they were biplane flying boats of conventional configuration with two-bay unstaggered wings and a rotary engine mounted pusher-fashion on struts.The French Navy ordered some 90 aircraft in this original configuration dubbed DD-2.
In 1917,the aircraft was redsigned to take advantage of the new Hispano-Suiza 8 engine,the Navy ordered another 365 machines. Donnet-Denhaut increased the wingspan by adding a third bay to the wing and a place for a second gunner, bringing the total crew to three.This version (known as the DD-8) became the most produced, with around 500 aircraft built.The DD-8 was also known as the Donnet-Denhaut 300-hp.

Further changes added a second machine gun to each gunner's station (the DD-9) and twin engines mounted in a push-pull configuration (the DD-10). Following the war, a few military surplus DDs were remanufactured as the Donnet HB.3 and operated commercially.
DD flying boats were operated by the US Navy in Europe, flying from Dunkirk to protect convoys from submarines.50 aircraft of this type were purchased.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #205 on: July 31, 2019, 06:25:20 PM »
Dyn'Aéro CR.100 Series

The Dyn'Aéro CR.100 is a French kit built single engine, two-seater monoplane,primarily for aero club use.
The CR.100 is a conventional single engine, low-wing monoplane, with the large control surface areas and absence of dihedral expected in an aerobatic aircraft. The structure is mostly wood and fabric, though the main wing spar is a plywood and carbon laminate composite and carbon covered ply is an option for the wing surfaces.

Full dual controls,including a pair of left hand throttles,are fitted A sliding bubble canopy covers the cockpit and is faired behind into a rounded fuselage top deck. The wide track main conventional undercarriage has cantilever legs in fairings, with wheels usually in spats.The CR.100T variant offers the alternative of a tricycle undercarriage.

It is powered by a 180 hp Lycoming O-360 flat-4 engine,driving a fixed pitch,two-bladed propeller.Max speed is around 190 mph with a cruise of 160mph.
The CR.110 variant has a Lycoming engine uprated to 200 hp .The CR.120 high agility version is intended to be competitive using the 200hp uprated engine.
It differs from the CR.110 in having almost full span ailerons and a shorter span to increase the roll rate, at the cost of the flaps,structurally it has an entirely carbon fibre airframe.
The CR.120 was also intended for use as a military trainer.The first flight of the CR.100 was on 27 August 1992.The CR.120 flew in September 1996 and the CR.100T in November 2000.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2019, 06:26:30 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #206 on: August 01, 2019, 07:05:17 PM »
Dyn'Aéro MCR4S

The Dyn'Aéro MCR4S is a four-seat development of the French two seat, single engine Dyn'Aéro MCR01. It first flew in early 2000 and is sold as a kit for homebuilding in several versions.
The main changes are an increase in fuselage length to accommodate an extra row of seats with generous windows and the replacement of the flaperons seen on the long span variants of the MCR01, which have wings of about the same span as those of the MCR4S, with slotted flaps.
The cabin seats up to four,depending on the variant,in two side-by-side rows.Entry is via the large,forward hinged,two piece canopy.

A variety of Rotax flat four engines may be fitted, driving a two or three blade propeller, which may have fixed or variable pitch.
For example the top spec model uses a Rotax 914 UL flat four piston engine, turbocharged, air and water cooled, driving constant speed propeller,produces 113hp,enough for a max speed of 155mph or a cruise of around 140mph.
The Dyn'Aéro MCR4S flew for the first time on 14 June 2000.as a matter of interest,the MCR4S structure has been used by EADS Defence & Security for its EADS Surveyor 2500 drone.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #207 on: August 02, 2019, 05:25:22 PM »
Etablissements Borel hydro-monoplane.

The Borel Hydro-monoplane (also called Bo.8) was a French seaplane produced in 1912.

The aircraft, which was developed from the 1911 Morane-Borel monoplane, was a tractor monoplane powered by an 80 hp Gnome Lambda rotary engine.A curved aluminium cowling covered the top of the engine, and the sides of the fuselage were also covered with aluminium as far aft as the rear of the cockpit.Two seats were arranged in tandem, with the pilot sitting in front and dual controls were fitted.The main undercarriage consisted of a pair of flat-bottomed floats.Lateral control was achieved by wing warping.
One example was entered in the 1913 Schneider Trophy competition, but crashed during the elimination trials.Another, flown by George Chemet, was the winner of the 1913 Paris-Deauville race.

Military operators included Italy with the Corpo Aeronautico Militare, the UK RNAS and RFC,and in Brazil with the Brazil Navy and Police.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #208 on: August 03, 2019, 07:43:10 PM »
Farman MF.11

The Maurice Farman MF.11 Shorthorn is a French aircraft developed before World War I by the Farman Aviation Works.It was used as a reconnaissance and light bomber during the early part of World War I, later being relegated to training duties.
The Maurice Farman Shorthorn was the aircraft in which Biggles, Capt W.E. Johns' fictional character,took to the air in "Biggles Learns To Fly".

The MF.11 differed from the earlier Farman MF.7,in lacking the forward-mounted elevator, the replacement of the biplane horizontal tail with a single surface and a pair of rudders mounted above it,and the mounting of the nacelle containing crew and engine in the gap between the two wings.The aircraft was also fitted with a 0.30 in machine gun for the observer,whose position was changed from the rear to the front in order to give a clear field of fire.The engine was a Renault 8-cylinder air-cooled inline, of 100 hp.

The MF.11 served in both the British and French on the Western Front in the early stages of WWI. As a light bomber it flew the first bombing raid of the war when on 21 December 1914 an MF.11 of the Royal Naval Air Service attacked German artillery positions around Ostend.
It was withdrawn from front-line service on the Western Front in 1915, but continued to be used by the French in Macedonia and the Middle East, while the British also used it in the Dardanelles,and Africa.The Australian Flying Corps (AFC), provided with the MF.11 by the British Indian Army, operated it during the Mesopotamian campaign of 1915–16.
Italy's Società Italiana Aviazione,licence-built a number of MF.11s under the designation SIA 5 from early 1915, fitted with a fixed forward machine gun and a 100 hp Fiat A.10 engine.

There are a few surviors in air museums in Canada, Belgium and Australia.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2019, 07:45:05 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #209 on: August 04, 2019, 07:04:27 PM »
Farman HF.30

The Henry Farman HF.30 was a two-seat military biplane designed in France around 1915, which became a principal aircraft of the Imperial Russian Air Service during the First World War.
The HF.30 was not adopted by other Allied air forces, and the manufacturers reused the "Farman F.30" designation for the Farman F.30 in 1917.

The basic airframe of the HF.30 was very similar to the earlier and smaller F.20, a two-bay biplane with a shorter lower wing,a long v-shaped tail framework, and similar control surfaces - ailerons on the outer sections of the upper wings, and a single rudder and a high tailplane at the rear. It differed by reviving the raised fuselage position of the 1913 MF.11, positioning the cockpit and engine between the wings rather than mounting them directly on top of the lower wing, and it was the first Farman to adopt the robust v-strut undercarriage that was becoming standard.
It improved on the underpowered F.20 by utilizing the much more potent 150 hp Salmson 9 radial engine,this gave it a top speed of 85-95mph.

At the start of the First World War the Farman type pusher biplane was widely regarded as the best available design for a combat aircraft. The unobstructed position of the cockpit provided a very wide field of fire for a forward-facing gun, not to mention a good view ahead and to the sides for piloting, aerial reconnaissance and artillery spotting. The greater lift of a biplane design enabled the plane to carry a heavier cargo, such as a payload of bombs under the wings. The relatively simple airframe was also seen as suitable for mass production, especially before synchronization gear became widely available, these criteria were enough to outweigh the superior speed and flight performance offered by monoplane designs with a tractor propeller.

Unusually the HF.30 was used exclusively by the Imperial Russian Air Service, and serial production appears to have taken place principally or entirely in Russia.The HF.30 appears to have been produced principally by the Dux Factory in Moscow, although some level of construction seems to have also taken place at several of the other major Russian aircraft factories.
There are sketchy references to the type's involvement in air combat,but it is not clear how far the HF.30 had been deployed before two consecutive developments in 1916 that curtailed its usefulness.The Air Service began to restrict the air superiority role to new high-performance planes equipped with synchronization gears, like the imported Nieuport 11; then, the HF.30 was definitively outclassed in combat by new opponents, beginning with the Albatros D.I fighter and the Albatros C.V scout. Furthermore, the HF.30's "pusher" engine came to be regarded as a large, exposed target from rearward attacks.

The wide availability of the type also meant that it was acquired by other emerging states of Eastern Europe.In 1919, a captured example became the first plane of the Estonian Air Force.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #210 on: August 05, 2019, 10:04:15 PM »
Farman F.110

The Farman F.110 was a French two-seat artillery observation biplane designed and built in the 1920`s.

The F.110 was an effort by Farman to produce an artillery observation aircraft normally supplied to the French military by rivals Breguet.Mainly of aluminium alloy construction it was a biplane design with a tailskid landing gear.Powered by a water-cooled 260 hp Salmson 9Z radial piston engine which was caused considerable drag because of the need for a large radiator box under the nose.

Armament was one fixed forward-firing 7.7mm (0.303in) machine-gun and two further machine-guns on flexible mounts in observers cockpit.
The pilot and observer had an open cockpit with glazed panels in the sides and the floor to give the observer a good view.After a first flight in 1921 the Aéronautique Militaire ordered 175 aircraft,however the F.110 suffered structural problems and after some modification only 50 aircraft were delivered and the type was not developed further.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #211 on: August 06, 2019, 06:46:52 PM »
Farman F.120 Jabiru Series.

The Farman F.120 and its derivatives were a family of multi-engine airliners and bombers of the 1920s built by the Farman Aviation Works.
The Jabiru, which was named after a Latin American stork, was a fixed-undercarriage sesquiplane powered by either two, three or four engines, depending on the variant. It featured an unusually broad chord, low aspect-ratio main wing and a very deep fuselage.The tri-motor variant had the centerline engine mounted high, giving it an unusual appearance.

The F.121 or F.3X was the first version to fly, with four 180 hp Hispano-Suiza 8Ac V8 engines mounted in tandem push-pull pairs mounted on stub wings,however this caused cooling problems for the rear engines.The F.120/F.4X version followed shortly afterwards,powered by three 300 hp Salmson Az.9 radial engines.Later versions included a single F.122, modified from an F.4X,powered by two 400 hp Lorraine 12Db engines.Two military versions were built, the F.123 with two 450 hp Hispano-Suiza 12Hb V12s, or F.124 with two 420 hp Gnome et Rhône 9Ad Jupiter radial`s.

To say it was an ugly aircraft is somewhat of an understatement, however it saw service with several European airlines,it could carry nine passengers and were operated until the late 1920`s.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2019, 06:47:36 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #212 on: August 07, 2019, 05:44:02 PM »
Farman F.200 Series

The Farman F.200 was a civil utility aircraft produced in France in the 1930s.
It was derived from the F.190,but featured a revised fuselage that did away with its predecessor's enclosed cabin. Instead, it was a parasol-wing monoplane with open cockpits in tandem for the pilot and one or two passengers. It was intended primarily to be a trainer,but it was also marketed as being suitable as a photographic platform or a cargo/mail plane.

A number of different engines were used ranging from 100hp to 120hp,which gave it a top speed of around 100mph - 110mph depending on the engine type fitted.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2019, 05:44:30 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #213 on: August 08, 2019, 06:42:33 PM »
Farman F.300 Series.

The Farman F.300 and F.310 were high-wing strut braced monoplane airliners with fixed tailskid undercarriage.
They had a trimotor layout and the cockpit and an 8 passenger compartment were fully enclosed.Most saw service in Farman's own airline, whose twelve F.300 variants made up half its fleet in 1931.

One variant, the F.302, was specially built as a single-engine machine to make an attempt at a number of world records.On 9 March 1931,Réginensi and Lalouette set new distance and duration records over a closed circuit with a 2,000 kg payload, flying 1,664 miles in 17 hours.Another, the F.304 was built as a special trimotor for Marcel Goulette to make a long-distance flight the same month from Paris to Tananarive and back.

The F.301 had  3 × Salmson 9Ab 9-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine,of 230 hp each. These allowed a max speed of 143mph with a normal cruise of 120mph.
22 aircraft were completed in 6 different production versions.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2019, 06:42:51 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #214 on: August 09, 2019, 07:32:32 PM »
Farman F.430

The Farman F.430 was a 1930s French light transport,two variants with different engines were known as the F.431 and F.432.
The F.430 was a low-wing cantilever monoplane with a tail-wheel landing gear,powered by two wing-mounted de Havilland Gipsy Major piston engines.It had a closed cockpit and the cabin had room for a pilot and five passengers.

The prototype F-ANBY appeared in 1934 and the F.431 variant with 180 hp Renault Bengali-Six inverted piston engines was exhibited at the 1934 Paris Salon de l'Aeronautique.
A further variant with 180 hp Farman radial engines was designated the F.432.
After the company had been nationalised and became part of SNCAC a variant with a retractable landing gear (the Centre 433) was completed, and flown for the first time in December 1938.The F.430 and two F.431s were used by Air Service between Paris and Biarritz. Just seven aircraft were completed in total.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2019, 07:33:18 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #215 on: August 10, 2019, 06:36:14 PM »
Farman F.500 Series

The Farman F.500 Monitor was a 1950s Franco-Belgian two-seat training aircraft.

Farman had earlier produced the Stampe SV.4 under licence,and with co-operation of Stampe,they designed a two-seat training monoplane using SV-4 components designated the Farman F.500.The prototype, named the Monitor I, first flew on 11 July 1952,it was a cantilever low-wing monoplane of mixed construction and conventional tail unit.
It was powered by a 140 hp Renault 4Pei engine,and had a fixed tailwheel landing gear and two crew in tandem under a continuous canopy.

In many respects it looked rather similar to the de Havilland Canada DHC-1 Chipmunk.
The production version designated the Monitor II went into production and first flew on 5 August 1955,it had all-metal wings and a more powerful Salmson-Argus 220hp engine.
Production also took place in Belgium with Stampe et Renard under the designation SR.7B Monitor IV.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2019, 06:37:41 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #216 on: August 11, 2019, 06:56:54 PM »
Ferber IX

The Antoinette III, which was originally called the Ferber IX, was an early experimental aircraft flown in France in the late 1900`s.
It was based on Ferdinand Ferber's previous design the Ferber VIII, and was quite unlike other Antoinette aircraft.It was renamed when Ferber became a director of the Antoinette company.

It was a two-bay biplane without a fuselage or any other enclosure for the pilot. A single elevator was carried on outriggers ahead of the aircraft, and a fixed fin and horizontal stabiliser behind.The undercarriage was of bicycle configuration and included small outriggers near the wingtips.Power was provided by an Antoinette 8V water cooled V-8 engine driving a tractor propeller.
Between July and September 1908,Ferber made a number of progressively longer flights,the longest recorded being on 15 September when he covered 6 miles in around 10 mins.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2019, 06:57:24 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #217 on: August 12, 2019, 06:29:33 PM »
Fouga CM.8 Series

The Fouga CM.8 or Castel-Mauboussin CM.8 was a French sailplane glider of the 1950s.

The CM.8 was a single-seat aircraft of conventional sailplane design and designed for aerobatics.
Two prototypes were built: the CM.8/13, with a 13-metre wingspan and a conventional tail layout, and the CM.8/15 with a 15-metre wingspan and a V-tail.
Tests showed excelent performance of the aircraft and this led to experiments with mounting a small turbojet on the dorsal fuselage, exhausting between the tail fins.
The first of these flew on 14 July 1949, powered by a Turbomeca Piméné. Designated the CM.8R this combined the 13-metre wing of the CM.8/13 with the V-tail of the CM.8/15. Two examples were built, and as experiments progressed in the 1950s, they were fitted with increasingly more powerful engines, and shorter wingspans.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2019, 06:30:33 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #218 on: August 13, 2019, 06:43:55 PM »
Fouga CM.10

The Fouga CM.10 was an assault glider designed for the French Army shortly after World War II, capable of carrying 35 troops.

The CM.10 was a high-wing cantilever monoplane of conventional configuration with fixed tricycle undercarriage. Flight tests with the glider prototypes had mixed results with the first prototype crashing on 5 May 1948. A production order for 100 was placed with Fouga, but it was cancelled after only 5 gliders had been completed.

Later Fouga adapted the design as an airliner, adding two 580hp SNECMA 12S piston engines. wo of the production CM.10 gliders were converted to the powered version, CM.100-01, the first prototype (F-WFAV),first flew on 19 January 1949, but no order resulted for this aircraft.
It was later tested with Turbomeca Piméné turbojets mounted on the wingtips as the CM.101R-01.The second aircraft, which was converted as CM.101R-02, (F-WFAV), was first flew on 23 Aug 1951.Only seven aircraft were completed.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #219 on: August 14, 2019, 06:22:57 PM »
Fouga CM.175 Zéphyr

The Fouga Zéphyr (company designation CM.175) was a 1950s French two-seat carrier-capable jet trainer for the French Navy,developed from the land-based CM.170 Magister.
Originally designated CM-170M Esquif, the prototype first flew on 31 July 1956, and was redesignated as the CM.175 Zéphyr soon after. Carrier trials were conducted from HMS Eagle (R05) and HMS Bulwark (R08) off the French coast.

It differed from the Magister in being equipped with an arrester hook and a modified structure and undercarriage strengthened for naval carrier operations.The Zéphyr also included a nose-mounted light.It did not have ejection seats,so new sliding canopy hoods were fitted which could be locked open during carrier launchings and landings.
One six-round rocket pod could be mounted under each wing for weapons training, and two guns could be fitted in the nose, but these were seldom carried. Thirty-two aircraft were delivered.
The first production aircraft made it`s first flight on 30 May 1959 and entered service in October 1959 with 59S the deck landing school at Hyéres. The squadron used only 14 aircraft at a time with the others being kept in short-term storage and rotated to even out the flying hours. In 1962 the unit formed an aerobatic team using the Zéphyr called the Patrouille de Voltige d'Hyéres.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #220 on: August 15, 2019, 06:50:31 PM »
FBA Type A,B, and C

The FBA Type A and the similar Type B and C were a family of reconnaissance flying boats produced in France prior to and during World War I.
The Type A had a single-bay wing, while the larger Type B and C had two bay wings which otherwise only differed in the engine installed, with the type B using a 100 hp Gnome Monosoupape and the type C using a 130 hp Clerget 9B.The pilot and observer sat side by side in the open cockpit.

The RNAS contracted for 20 type B's from Norman Thompson, who was responsible for building flying surfaces for hulls provided from France, which differed by having a rectangular all-flying rudder in place of the D shaped rudder used on French examples. The Type A was the only version with a fin attached to the rudder although some aircraft had a field modification with a fin being added between the hull and the tailplane.

The French Aéronautique Maritime, and Italian Navy followed with orders for Type Bs and Cs in 1915. The FBA flying boats were used for naval patrols and frequently encountered their opposing German and Austro-Hungarian Navy counterparts which led to some being converted to single seaters armed with a machine gun. Three Type Bs became the first aircraft operated by the Portuguese Navy.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2019, 06:50:55 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #221 on: August 16, 2019, 06:36:56 PM »
FBA 17 Series

The FBA 17 was a training flying boat produced in France in the 1920s.
Similar in layout to the aircraft that FBA had produced during WW I,the Type 17 was a two-bay biplane with unequal-span,unstaggered wings with side-by-side open cockpits.
Apart from service with the French Navy, a small number were sold to the Polish Navy, the Brazilian Air Force, and also civil operators.
Some versions were built as amphibians, and others had fittings to allow them to be catapulted from warships.
The most commonly used engine was the Hispano-Suiza 8A, a water-cooled V8 SOHC aero engine that produced 140hp to 180hp depending on the specific subtype fitted.

The US Coast Guard purchased an example in 1931 for test and evaluation, they were pleased with the design, and arranged for the type to be built under licence by the Viking Flying Boat Company in Connecticut.Six aircraft were eventually produced and served with the Coast Guard under the designation OO until the outbreak of World War II.These were fitted with Wright R-760 engines with a gear-driven supercharger to boost its power output to 225hp.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2019, 06:38:16 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #222 on: August 17, 2019, 09:53:37 PM »
FBA 310

The FBA Type 310 was a 1930s French touring flying boat or amphibian built by the Franco-British Aviation Company.

The Type 310 was the last design from FBA, and was their only monoplane flying boat.It was designed to sell into a growing market for touring flying-boats in the 1920s and 1930s, the 310 was a shoulder-wing flying boat with stabilizing floats attached to the struts that braced the wing to the hull. It was powered by a single 120 hp Lorraine 5Pc radial engine driving a pusher propeller. The engine was strut-mounted above the wing, with the cabin accommodating a pilot and two passengers.
An amphibian version was also built as the 310/1, but the added weight of the landing gear meant that only one passenger could be carried.
Design and development ceased in 1931 with the lack of both orders and funds, and the factory closed in 1934 when the company was sold to Société des Avions Bernard.

Six Type 310`s and 3 Type 310/1`s were completed.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #223 on: August 18, 2019, 05:28:11 PM »
Gourdou-Leseurre GL.2

The Gourdou-Leseurre GL.2 (originally, the Gourdou-Leseurre Type B) was a French fighter aircraft which made its maiden flight in 1918.
The GL.2 was a development of the Gourdou-Leseurre Type A which had shown promising performance in testing,but had been rejected by the Aéronautique Militaire due to concerns about the wing design.
The Type B featured not only a new wing,braced by four struts on either side in place of the two per side on the Type A, but also a revised fin and rudder and strengthened undercarriage.20 examples were delivered in November 1918, designated GL.2C.1 in service, but the end of the war meant a loss of official interest.

Gourdou-Leseurre continued development,and by 1920 had an improved version,designated GL.21 or B2 ready for exhibition at the Paris Salon de l'Aéronautique that year.
Two years later, a further revision appeared as the GL.22 or B3. This featured a redesigned wing of greater span, and modified horizontal stabiliser and landing gear.
It proved to be a moderate success,selling 20 to the Aéronautique Maritime as the GL.22C.1, as well as 18 to Finland, 15 to Czechoslovakia, 15 to Estonia, one to Latvia, and Yugoslavia.
The engine was usually a Hispano-Suiza 8Ab,180 hp which gave decent performance, but other engines were used at times.

Manufacture of the GL.22 resumed in an unarmed version known to the company as the B5 and purchased by both the Aéronautique Militaire and Aéronautique Maritime as the GL.22ET.1 for use as an advanced trainer. One of these aircraft was used for trials aboard the aircraft carrier Béarn.
Well into the 1930s, specialised aerobatic versions were produced as the B6 and B7 for Jérôme Cavalli and Fernand Malinvaud respectively, with a second B7 built for Adrienne Bolland.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 05:30:28 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #224 on: August 19, 2019, 06:29:11 PM »
Gourdou-Leseurre GL.30, GL40 and GL50 Series

The Gourdou-Leseurre GL.30 was a racing aircraft built in France in 1920 which formed the basis for a highly successful family of fighter aircraft based on the same design.
Like most of Gordou-Lesserre's earlier aircraft, it was a parasol wing design but its planform was trapezoidal rather than rectangular.It was fitted with a beefy  Gnome et Rhône 9A Jupiter VIII 9-cyliner air-cooled radial piston engine,of 600 hp.

The GL.31, which had a greater span, almost double the wing area, a fixed undercarriage,and a Gnome-Rhône 9A engine.It was armed with four machine guns,two in the forward fuselage and two in the wings. The GL. 31 was not flown until 1926 and then abandoned, overtaken by the GL.32, the company's entry in a 1923 Aéronautique Militaire competition to select a new fighter. It returned to a rectangular plan wing.

Eventually, 475 of this basic version, dubbed LGL.32C.1 in service, would be ordered by the Aéronautique Militaire and 15 more by the Aéronautique Maritime. Romania ordered a further 50 aircraft of the same design as the examples in French service, Turkey ordered 12 (these designated LGL.32-T) and another one may have been purchased by Japan.
The GL.32 was not long-lasting, and attrition took a heavy toll,by 1934, all remaining examples were relegated to training and as instructional airframes; at the start of 1936, only 135 remained of the original 380 purchased. A number of these were sold to the government of the Second Spanish Republic and to the autonomous Basque Government. Another aircraft was supplied to the Basques in 1937, modified as a dive bomber along the lines of the previous French trials.

« Last Edit: August 19, 2019, 08:23:18 PM by Angry Turnip »