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Author Topic: The slightly less well known  (Read 29506 times)

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Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #175 on: July 01, 2019, 06:31:29 PM »
Bloch MB.480


The Bloch MB.480 was a French twin-engined torpedo-bomber/reconnaissance floatplane designed just before the start of the Second World War.
In May 1937, the French Air Ministry placed an order with Société des Avions Marcel Bloch for two prototype floatplanes intended to fulfill a French Navy requirement for a twin-engined torpedo-bomber/reconnaissance floatplane.

The Bloch MB.480 was a low-winged monoplane that resembled the earlier Bloch MB.131 reconnaissance/bomber landplane.It was powered by two 1,060 hp Gnome-Rhône 14N radial engines and carried a crew of five. Defensive armament was a 7.5 mm Darne machine gun in the nose and a ventral bath, while a 20 mm cannon was fitted in a powered dorsal mounting. A usful load of bombs, torpedoes or auxiliary fuel tanks could be carried in an internal bomb bay.

The first prototype made its maiden flight in June 1939. The aircraft's twin tail was raised to avoid spray on take-off and landing, and the tail fins were cropped to ensure a good field of fire for the dorsal cannon after the tail assembly had been raised. The second prototype flew in October 1939.
Testing was relatively successful, the French Navy had meanwhile decided that the torpedo-bomber reconnaissance role could be better met by landplanes.On 9th September 1939, Bloch was told to suspend development trials, while on 10th December it was officially announced that no orders would be placed for either the MB.480 or its two competitors, the SNCAC NC-410 and the Loire-Nieuport 10.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #176 on: July 02, 2019, 07:33:37 PM »
Breguet 19

The Breguet 19 was designed as a successor to a highly successful World War I light bomber, the 14. A new, updated design was flown in March 1922, featuring a conventional layout with a single 450 hp Renault 12Kb inline engine. The aircraft was built in a sesquiplane platform, with lower wings substantially smaller than the upper ones.After trials, the Breguet 19 was ordered by the French Army's Aéronautique Militaire in September 1923.

The first 11 Breguet 19 prototypes were powered by a number of different engines. A "trademark" of Breguet was the wide usage of duralumin as a construction material, instead of steel or wood. At that time, the aircraft was faster than other bombers, and even some fighter aircraft.

The fuselage,was ellipsoid in cross-section, with a frame of duralumin tubing.The front section was covered with duralumin sheets, and the tail and wings were canvas covered. It had a conventional fixed landing gear with rear skid. The crew of two, pilot and observer/bombardier, sat in tandem in open cockpits, with dual controls.
A fixed 7.7 mm (0.303 in) Vickers machine gun with an interrupter gear was operated by the pilot, while the observer had twin 7.7 mm (0.303 in) Lewis Guns.There was also a fourth machine gun, which could be fired by the observer through an opening in the floor.   

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #177 on: July 03, 2019, 07:52:45 PM »
Breguet 26T

The 26T was an attempt by the Breguet company to find a civil market for their 19 warplane by mating its wings, tail surfaces and undercarriage to an entirely new fuselage design and new engine.A Gnome et Rhône 9Ab (licence-built Bristol Jupiter),of 420 hp,which gave it a max speed of 128mph.
One of the two Breguet-built civil examples,the engine was later changed back to the Lorraine 12Ed inline, as used on the Br.19.
 
It could carry six passengers within an enclosed cabin, while the pilots sat in an open cockpit ahead of the upper wing.CASA purchased a licence to build another two in Sain for the domestic market, and France's Aviation Militaire purchased two more as air ambulances under the designation Bre.26TSbis.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2019, 07:53:58 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #178 on: July 04, 2019, 09:34:01 PM »
Breguet 460

The Breguet 460 was a light bomber, initially designed a multifunctional aircraft,by the French aviation authorities.
Based on aspects of the Breguet 413,it was a monoplane fitted with two powerful radial Gnome et Rhône 14Kjrs engines, having a more aerodynamic design, although it kept the tail of the obsolete 413. Production was delayed due to minor design problems,and when the first prototype of the Breguet 460 Vultur flew, it could not achieve the 400 km/h (250 mph) required for a high-speed bomber.The French Air Ministry lost interest in this unit and concentrated on projects by other companies.

The Spanish Civil War provided the French aircraft industry with an opportunity both for getting rid of obsolete aircraft and for testing new developments,thus the Breguet 460 prototypes ended up in the Spanish Republican Air Force. One of the units seen in a picture of the Spanish conflict has an improved, more modern tail of the same type that would be used later for the Breguet 470 Fulgur airliner.
Details of Spanish units operating them are sketchy at best,it is known that one of these aircraft was based at the Celrà airfield towards the end of the conflict and that it belonged to the Night Flight Group no. 11, which comprised the Vultur and two Bloch MB.210.

The Breguet Br 462 was a modernized version of the 460, although still similar,it made its first test flight towards the end of 1936. The forward fuselage was redesigned to look more aerodynamic and the aircraft was fitted with two Gnome Rhone 14NO engines that allowed it to reach a speed of 402 km/h (250 mph).It has been described as similar to the Breguet 461 that was supplied to Japan in 1935.
Plans were made forinstallation of 1,350 hp engines, expected to give it a speed of around 300 mph.Defensive armament was a forward-firing 20 mm cannon and two rear-firing machine guns.

Only three Breguet 462s were built. Two of them served in the Vichy French Air Force where they did not see much action and were scrapped in 1942.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2019, 09:34:26 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #179 on: July 05, 2019, 07:03:31 PM »
Breguet G.11E

The Breguet G.11E was a French passenger coaxial rotors helicopter flown soon after World War II. Only one was built, development ceased when funding ran out.
Breguet developed his wartime studies of a project named the G.34 into the two-passenger Breguet G.11E, otherwise known as the Société Francaises du Gyroplane G.11E.

It was a much larger aircraft, the G.11E used the same coaxial, three blade twin rotor layout as on the Gyroplane Laboratoire.It was initially powered by a fan cooled
240 hp Potez 9E nine cylinder radial engine midmounted under the concentric rotor shafts.The control column alters cyclic pitch via swashplates,and pedals make torque corrections and control yaw by changing the relative collective pitch of the two rotors.A mechanical inertial governor limited rotor acceleration; the pilot could increase the collective pitch over that set by the governor but not below it, emergencies apart.

The first flight was made on 21 May 1949 but tests showed that the G.11E was very underpowered,so the engine was changed to a bigger nine-cylinder radial, a 450 hp Pratt & Whitney Wasp Junior.The name was changed to G.111 and some re-design accompanied the power increase; the rotor diameter was increased by 1.00 m (3 ft 3 in) and the fuselage lengthened to include two more seats so that four passengers could be carried.
The G.111 began flight tests in 1951 but these were not completed as SFG were declared bankrupt the following year.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2019, 07:05:14 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #180 on: July 06, 2019, 11:36:34 PM »
Breguet Deux-Ponts

The Breguet 761/763/765 are a family of 1940s and 1950s French double-deck transport aircraft,Deux-Ponts (Double-Decker) was not an official name.
Design work on the Breguet 761 double-deck airliner even before the end of WWII.It was decided that a medium-range airliner with seating for over 100 passengers would be built. The design envisaged using readily available engines with the aim of ease of manufacture and an early first-flight date.

The prototype Br.761, F-WASK, first flew at Villacoublay on 15 February 1949,it was powered by four 1,580 hp SNECMA 14R-24 radial engines.It was followed by three Br.761S pre-production aircraft powered by 2,020 hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800-B31 radial engines.These were fitted with 12 ft 1½in Hamilton Standard propellers.The aircraft successfully completed their trials incident-free.Their first flights were in 1951 and 1952.

The French Government ordered 12 production aircraft, the Breguet 76-3, which was later redesignated Br.763.Six aircraft were to be operated by Air France and the other six by the Ministry of Transport. The 763 had more powerful engines, a larger wingspan, strengthened wings and a three-crew flight deck (earlier aircraft had four crew). The 763 first flew on 20 July 1951 and entered service with Air France during autumn 1952.

Air France aircraft had accommodation for 59 passengers on the top deck, and 48 on the lower deck, although the aircraft was capable of carrying 135 passengers in a high-density layout.During 1964 Air France transferred six Br.763s to the French Air Force. They also acquired the three pre-production Br.761S aircraft and four new Br.765 Sahara freighter aircraft with removable cargo doors.They provided the French Air Force with a valuable transport fleet for moving personnel and materials to the Pacific nuclear testing areas.The Sahara fleet was retired in 1972.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2019, 11:37:08 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #181 on: July 07, 2019, 07:25:43 PM »
Breguet 941

The Breguet 941 was a French four-engine turboprop STOL transport aircraft developed by Breguet in the 1960s.
Louis Charles Breguet developed a concept for a Short Take Off and Landing (STOL) aircraft using four free-turbine turboshaft engines to drive a common powershaft, which, in turn drove four oversize propellers, which were evenly spaced along the leading edge of the wing with large, full-span, slotted flaps, with the arrangement known as "l'aile soufflée" or blown wing.

An experimental prototype, powered by four Turbomeca Turmo II engines, the Breguet 940 Integral, first flew on 21 May 1958,and was used to prove the concept, demonstrating excellent short field performance.This led to an order being placed in February 1960 for a prototype of an aircraft employing the same concept,but capable of carrying useful loads.This aircraft,the Breguet 941,first flew on 1 June 1961.

Further testing of this prototype resulted in an order for four improved production aircraft, the Breguet 941S for the French Air Force, first flying on 19 April 1967. These were fitted with more powerful engines and a modified rear cargo door to allow for air-drops.

The 941 prototype was tested extensively by both France, and the USA, where a license agreement had been drafted with McDonnell Aircraft.The prototype, known as the McDonnell 188 in the US, was evaluated by both NASA and the US military, but no orders were placed.
The second Br 941S also carried out a tour of the USA, being evaluated as a STOL passenger airliner for operation from small city airports,again, no orders resulted.The aircraft demonstration activity included flights for Eastern Airlines in the northeast U.S.

The four Breguet 941S aircraft entered service with the French Air Force in 1967,they were retired in 1974.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2019, 07:29:46 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #182 on: July 08, 2019, 07:27:23 PM »
Breguet Br 904 Nymphale

The Breguet Br 104 Nymphale (English: Nymph) is a two-seat trainer and competition sailplane, built in France in the 1950s.
The Nymphale is a two-seat development of the double World Gliding Championships (WGC) winning Br 901 Mouette.It is larger all round, with a 2.72 m (8 ft 11 in) increase in span and 1.43 m (4 ft 8 in) longer, but is still built of wood and fabric like the single-seater.

The mid mounted wings,are straight-tapered like those of the 901,but differ in having no sweep on the leading edge so that at mid-chord the wing is forward-swept.
The lengthened cockpit,has the same style of fuselage contour following canopy as the 901 but is divided into front and rear sections,with the rear stretching back over the wing leading edge.

It`s first flight on 26 May 1956,3 prototypes were completed,and fifteen production series 904S Nymphales were built in the late 1950s and widely used by gliding clubs.
The Nymphale also competed: one placed 5th in the two-seater class of the 1956 WGC held at Saint-Yan in France.Six aircraft remain airworthy, all in France.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 07:27:49 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #183 on: July 09, 2019, 06:10:30 PM »
Brochet MB.70

The Brochet MB.70 was a light two-seater aircraft developed in France in the early 1950s for recreational flying and amateur construction.
It was a high-wing braced monoplane that seated the pilot and passenger in tandem within a fully enclosed cabin. It was fitted with fixed tailwheel undercarriage layout and was of all-wooden construction.
A requirement from the Service de l'Aviation Légère et Sportive for a new light aircraft for French aeroclubs speeded progress, and a series of development machines were built with a several different engines, eventually leading to the Brochet MB.80.

The MB.72 of which five were built used a Continental A65 horizontally opposed four-cylinder engine 0f 65hp,giving the aircraft a very sedate max speed of 81mph.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2019, 06:12:07 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #184 on: July 10, 2019, 06:17:00 PM »
Caudron Type D

The Caudron Type D was a French pre-WW I single seat,twin-boom tractor biplane, a close but slightly smaller relative of the two seat Caudron Type C.
The Type D was a two bay biplane with an inner bay only about half the width of the outer. Both two spar fabric covered wings had rectangular plans apart from angled tips. There was no stagger, so the two sets of parallel interplane struts were parallel and vertical.The upper wing overhang produced by the sesquiplane modification was supported by extra parallel pairs of outward leaning interplane struts,and wire bracing completed the structure.

The Type D first appeared in December 1911 and in total thirteen were built.One was sold in England and three others to China,the Chinese aircraft had the more powerful 45 hp 6-cylinder Anzani radial engine.This engine was again mounted uncowled, showing its characteristic ring exhaust.

Another Type D powered by a larger 6-cylinder Anzani, producing 60 hp, was delivered from Paris on 21 June 1912 by Guillaux to Mr Ramsay in London.
It had a longer nacelle which seated two, had curved, raised decking immediately ahead of the cockpit and was suspended between the innermost interplane struts.
Caudron referred to this version as the Type D2. With tanks for 125 l (27 imp gal; 33 US gal) it had an endurance of around 3 hours.
It is not known how many aircraft were constructed in the UK by Ewen Aviation or its successor, British Caudron.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #185 on: July 11, 2019, 07:40:00 PM »
Caudron R.11

The Caudron R.11, was a French five-seat twin-engine bomber,reconnaissance and escort biplane developed and produced during the First World War.
It was originally intended to fulfill the French Corps d'Armee reconnaissance category.The R11 was similar to the Caudron R.4, but with a more pointed nose, two bracing bays outboard the engines rather than three, no nose-wheel, and a much bigger tail.

The engines were housed in streamlined nacelles just above the lower wing,they were a pair of Hispano-Suiza 8Bba V-8 water-cooled piston engines,210 hp each.
Max speed was around 120mph and it was armed with five 7.7 mm (0.30 in) Lewis machine guns.
The French army ordered 1000 R.11s,and production began in 1917, with the first aircraft completed late in that year.In February 1918 the first squadron R.26 was equipped. The last squadron to form before the Armistice was R.246, at which point 370 planes had been completed and production ended soon after.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #186 on: July 12, 2019, 04:47:49 PM »
Caudron C.27

The Caudron C.27 was a French biplane, a two-seat basic trainer which also competed successfully in the 1920s.
It was a two bay biplane,without stagger or significant dihedral.It had rectangular plan wings,each built around two wooden spars and they were fabric covered.These were braced with parallel interplane struts, assisted by piano-wire bracing. There were simple parallel cabane struts between the upper wing centre section and the upper fuselage longerons.Ailerons were fitted only to the upper wing.

The C.27 was powered by a 80 hp Le Rhône 9C nine cylinder air-cooled rotary engine,driving a two blade propeller and with a cowling which surrounded its upper three-quarters.
This give it a max speed of around 80mph,later versions had more powerful engines fitted,up to 130 hp.These were designated C.125`s.

The exact date of the first flight,is not known but the aircraft was flown publicly at Orly at the end of June 1922.Two years later a C.27 won the 1924 Zenith Cup, a trophy based on fuel consumption and load carrying ability.The C.128 was again very similar but powered by a 120 hp Salmson 9AC, a nine-cylinder, air cooled radial engine.
At least twenty-one C.27, C.125, C.127 and C.128 aircraft appeared on the French civil register at one time.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #187 on: July 13, 2019, 06:16:04 PM »
Caudron C.430 Rafale

The Caudron C.430 Rafale was a fast, two seat French touring monoplane.
It was a two-seat development of the single seat Caudron C.362, the winner of the 1933 Coupe Deutsch de la Meurthe.It was slightly larger and heavier, though with a lower wing loading,the Rafale was a low wing cantilever monoplane, wood framed and covered with a mixture of plywood and fabric.
It`s one piece,single spar wing was strongly straight tapered to elliptical tips and was plywood covered with an outer layer of fabric.There were flaps inboard of the ailerons.
It had an air cooled 150 hp inverted four cylinder 6.3 l (384 cu in) inline Renault 4Pei Bengali engine in the nose,driving a two blade, two position variable pitch propeller.This gave an impressive top speed of 190 mph and a cruise of 160mph.

On 31st March 1934,about a week after its first flight, the C.430 F-AMVB set a new International speed record of 181 mph over 100 km (62 mi) for aircraft with an empty weight less than 560 kg (1,235 lb).
Hélène Boucher, a prominent French pilot in the mid-1930s, died in a landing approach accident in F-AMVB on 30 November 1934.Just two aircraft were completed.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2019, 06:16:31 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #188 on: July 14, 2019, 06:11:42 PM »
Caudron C.440 Goéland

The Caudron C.440 Goéland ("seagull") was a six-seat twin-engine utility aircraft developed in France in the mid-1930s.Eighteen subtypes were built over it`s production run.

It`s construction was almost wooden throughout,with wooden skinning except for the forward and upper fuselage sections,which were skinned in metal.It was a conventionally configured low-wing cantilever monoplane with tailwheel undercarriage.The main undercarriage units retracted into the engine nacelles.
Standard configuration was a crew of two,seating for six passengers,with baggage compartments fore and aft, and a toilet to the rear.

Production of the C.440 and its varients continued until the outbreak of WWII, at which time many C.440s were pressed into military service.Following the fall of France, some were operated by the German Luftwaffe and Deutsche Luft Hansa. Another user was the Slovenské vzdušné zbrane - it ordered 12 aircraft as the C.445M in 1942.

Production began again after the war for military and civil use as a transport and as a twin-engined trainer.In the postwar reorganisation of the French aircraft industry, Caudron became part of SNCA du Nord and the aircraft became the Nord Goeland; 325 of these were built.Commercial operators included Air France, SABENA, Aigle Azur and Compagnie Air Transport (CAT).

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #189 on: July 15, 2019, 07:59:52 PM »
Caudron C.710.

The C.710 were a series of light fighter aircraft developed by Caudron-Renault for the French Air Force just prior to the start of World War II.
The contract that led to the C.710 series was offered in 1936 to quickly raise the number of modern aircraft in French service, by supplying a "light fighter" of wooden construction that could be built rapidly in large numbers without upsetting the production of existing types.The contract resulted in three designs, the Arsenal VG-30, the Bloch MB.700, and the C.710. Prototypes of all three were ordered.

A common feature of the Caudron line was a long nose that set the cockpit far back on the fuselage.The nose housed the 450 hp Renault 12R-01, a supercharged inverted and air-cooled V-12 engine that resulted from putting together two 6Q engines.The landing gear was fixed and spatted, and the vertical stabilizer was a seemingly World War I-era semicircle instead of a more common trapezoidal or triangular design. Armament consisted of a 20 mm Hispano-Suiza HS.9 cannon under each wing in a small pod.

The C.710 prototype first flew on 18 July 1936.[3] Despite its small size, it showed good potential and was able to reach a level speed of 292 mph during flight testing. Further development continued with the C.711 and C.712 with more powerful engines, while the C.713 which flew on 15 December 1937 introduced retractable landing gear and a more conventional triangular vertical stabilizer.
The final evolution of the 710 series was the C.714 Cyclone, a variation on the C.713 which first flew in April 1938 as the C.714.01 prototype. The primary changes were a new wing airfoil profile, a strengthened fuselage, and instead cannons, the fighter had four 7.5 mm MAC 1934 machine guns in the wing gondolas. It was powered by the newer 12R-03 version of the engine, which introduced a new carburettor that could operate in negative g.

The French Air Force ordered 20 C.714s on 5 November 1938, with options for a further 180. Production started at a Renault factory in the Paris suburbs in summer 1939.Deliveries did not start until January 1940. After a series of tests with the first production examples, it became apparent that the design was seriously flawed. Although light and fast, its wooden construction did not permit a more powerful engine to be fitted,with the result that the Caudron was withdrawn from active service in February 1940.
In March, the initial production order was reduced to 90, as the performance was not considered good enough to warrant further production contracts. Eighty were diverted to Finland to fight in the Winter War. These were meant to be flown by French pilots,only six aircraft were delivered, and an additional ten were waiting in the harbour when deliveries were stopped.

On 18 May 1940, 35 Caudrons were delivered to the Polish Warsaw Squadron,I/145, stationed at the Mions airfield. After just 23 sorties, adverse opinion of the fighter was confirmed by frontline pilots who expressed concerns that it was seriously underpowered and was no match for contemporary German fighters.

On 25 May, only a week after it was introduced, French Minister of War Guy La Chambre ordered all C.714s to be withdrawn from active service. However,the French had no other aircraft to offer, the Polish ignored the order and continued to fly the Caudrons. Despite flying a fighter hopelessly outdated compared to the Messerschmitt Bf 109E, the Polish pilots scored 12 confirmed and three unconfirmed victories in three battles between 8 June and 11 June, losing nine in the air and nine more on the ground. Among the aircraft shot down were four Dornier Do 17 bombers, and also three Messerschmitt Bf 109 and five Messerschmitt Bf 110 fighters.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #190 on: July 16, 2019, 07:39:08 PM »
Caudron Aiglon

The Caudron C.600 Aiglon is a 1930s French two-seat monoplane sport/touring aircraft built by Caudron–Renault.
The Aiglon (en: Eaglet) was designed by Marcel Riffard after he took over the design department when Caudron merged with Renault.It was a two-seat low-wing cantilever monoplane with tandem open cockpits,the first of two prototypes first flew in March 1935 from Issy-les-Moulineaux, France.

In December 1935 a C.610 special long-distance single-seat version with increased fue was flown from Paris to Saigon at an average speed of 80 mph.
Powerplant was usually a Renault 4Pgi Bengali Junior inline piston engine,of 100 hp giving a max speed of around 135mph,other engines were fitted to some versions.
With the outbreak of the Second World War many of the aircraft were requisitioned by the French Government for use as liaison aircraft by the Armée de l'Air. Total production of the Aiglon was 203 aircraft, including 178 of the basic Renault 4Pgi Bengali Junior powered model.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #191 on: July 17, 2019, 05:21:47 PM »
CAMS 33

The CAMS 33 was a reconnaissance flying boat built in France in the early 1920s.It was designed in response to a French Navy requirement for new flying boats for various roles.
Chantiers Aéro-Maritimes de la Seine (CAMS) submitted prototype aircraft in two categories for the Navy requirement,as both a reconnaissance aircraft and a transport.The design was a conventional biplane flying boat with equal-span unstaggered wings and two engines mounted in a single nacelle in tractor-pusher configuration.
It featured an open cockpit for two pilots, plus open bow and dorsal gun positions on the reconnaissance machine, or an enclosed cabin for seven passengers on the transport version, which was not selected for production.

The armed reconnaissance version was accepted as the 33B.Twelve aircraft were eventually produced for the French Navy,equipping Escadrille 1R1 at Cherbourg.
Yugoslavia purchased another six machines.The 33T prototype flew under civil registration for a few years, but was unable to attract customers.
They were powered by 2 × Hispano-Suiza 8F,of 275 hp each, giving a max speed of around 110mph.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2019, 05:22:45 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #192 on: July 18, 2019, 05:52:11 PM »
CAMS 54

The CAMS 54 was a development and more powerful version of the French CAMS 51 civil transport and naval reconnaissance flying boat,designed for transatlantic flights.
It was a single-bay biplane with equal span,rectangular plan wings mounted without stagger.The upper wing was in three parts, a short centre section and two long outer panels; the lower wing had two inner panels, mounted on the upper fuselage and strengthened by short, parallel pairs of struts to mid-fuselage, and two outer panels.
 
It was powered by a pair of engines in push-pull configuration, mounted above the fuselage and just below the upper wing on two inward-leaning pairs of tubular N-struts.Their mounting also supported the wing centre-section with parallel pairs of struts outwards to the spars.Two types of engine could be used, either 500 hp Hispano-Suiza 12Mbr V12 enclosed in a common streamlined cowling, or 480 hp) Gnome-Rhône 9Akx Jupiter nine-cylinder radials, mounted uncowled for cooling, with a circular section cowling between them.

The CAMS 54's first flights were made in late March 1928, powered with the Hispano-Suiza engines.By 12 May 1928 it was making long test flights with the Gnome et Rhône radials.On 22 July the CAMS 54, with the radial engines, named La Frégate and crewed by Paris, second pilot and wireless operator Cadou and flight engineer Marot, flew to Horta, Azores.The first eight hours were uneventful at speeds around 109 mph, but failure of the rear engine then seriously slowed the aircraft and the 1,290 mi;flight lasted about 14 hr 15 min,at an average speed of about 90 mph.

Inspection of the engine after landing showed it could not be repaired and also that the heavy loads sustained by the forward engine operating alone had caused serious wear, ruling out further long flights. The French Marine Ministry therefore decided to bring La Frégate back to the mainland by boat.

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #193 on: July 19, 2019, 07:32:51 PM »
Potez-CAMS 141

The Potez-CAMS 141 was a French long range reconnaissance flying boat of the late 1930s. Intended to equip the French Navy, only a single prototype was completed before the German invasion of France halted production.
The 141 was designed by Chantiers Aéro-Maritimes de la Seine (or CAMS, which since 1933 had been part of Potez) to meet a 1935 French Navy specification for a long range marine reconnaissance flying boat to replace obsolete aircraft.

It was a four engined monoplane, powered by Hispano-Suiza 12Y liquid-cooled V-12 piston engines,of 860 hp each.Max speed was just under 200mph,cruise was around 160mph.
It had a high aspect ratio wing mounted above the fuselage and a twin tail.It was armed with a dorsal turret carrying two 7.5 mm Darne machine guns, with a further two machine guns in lateral barbettes and two in waist positions.

After evaluation, a production order for four aircraft was placed, with a further 15 being ordered before the start of the WWII.The prototype, named Antarès entered service with Escadrille E8 of the French Navy in September 1939, flying its first patrol mission over the Atlantic on 20 September 1939.
No production aircraft had been completed by the time of the Armistice in June 1940, with Antarès being evacuated to Port Lyautey in Morocco.
It was operated by the Vichy French Navy,until the allied invasion of North Africa, when after brief fighting, the French armed forces in North Africa joined with the Free French. Antarès continued in service, carrying out patrols over the Central and South Atlantic.Antarès was retired and scrapped early in 1944.


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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #194 on: July 20, 2019, 05:46:37 PM »
CFA D.7 Cricri Major

The CFA D.7 Cricri Major was a French-built light civil aircraft of the 1940s.
It was a postwar-built light high-wing monoplane with enclosed two-seat tandem glazed cabin with fixed tail-wheel undercarriage, powered by a 90hp Salmson 5Aq-01 radial engine. Cruise speed was 80mph with a max speed of 93 mph, it had a range of just over 300 miles.

An initial series of ten Cricri (Cricket) Majors was completed and these were bought by aero clubs and private pilots.The design was rather outdated and no further examples were completed.Four D.7s remained in service in 1956 and one example, F-BFNG remained airworthy in 1967. This aircraft has been restored to airworthiness and was operational in 2005.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2019, 05:46:54 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #195 on: July 21, 2019, 05:42:03 PM »
CAB Minicab

The CAB GY-20 Minicab is a two-seat light aircraft built in France in the late 1940`s.
Its design was a scaled-down version of Yves Gardan`s designed SIPA S.90. The pilot and passenger sit side by side and access to the cockpit is via a one-piece perspex canopy that hinges forwards. Gardan's intention was to produce a low-cost, easy-to-fly, easy-to-maintain aircraft with the possibility of homebuilding the aircraft.

The prototype Minicab first flew at Pau-Idron on 1 February 1949.CAB manufactured a total of 22 Minicabs.This was followed by a larger number completed by amateur builders in France and other countries.Several Minicabs are currently active in the UK have been rebuilt to the JB.01 standard developed by M. Jean Barritault. Falconar sold plans for a tricycle gear homebuilt model named the Minihawk.

It was powered by a Continental A65 four-cylinder air-cooled horizontally-opposed piston engine,of 65 hp,which gave it a cruising speed of around 100mph or a max of 112 mph.
Type certification was obtained in mid-April 1949.Approx 160 aircraft were completed,over 130 were home builds.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2019, 05:42:53 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #196 on: July 22, 2019, 06:40:07 PM »
Couzinet 70

The Couzinet 70 was a 1930s French three-engined commercial monoplane built by Société des Avions René Couzinet founded by René Couzinet.
The Couzinet 70 Arc-en-Ciel III (Rainbow) was developed from the 1920s Couzinet 10 Arc-en-Ciel, which first flew on 7 May 1928, the Couzinet 11 and Couzinet 40.

The larger span Couzinet 70 was developed originally as a mail plane for use of Aéropostale's South Atlantic service.
It was a low-wing monoplane with an usual sweep up to the vertical stabiliser,and featured a fixed undercarriage.
The aircraft was powered by three  Hispano-Suiza 12Nb V-12 liquid-cooled piston engine,of 650 hp each.The wing mounted engines could be accessed in flight through tunnels in the wing.
After route-proving in 1933 the aircraft was modified and re-designated the Couzinet 71 and entered service with Aéropostale in May 1934.

It had a crew of four,cruising speed was around 160 mph with a max speed of 174 mph,range was over 4200 miles.Only three aircraft were completed.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 06:41:24 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #197 on: July 23, 2019, 06:10:12 PM »
Dewoitine D.7

The Dewoitine D.7 was a French ultra-light sport plane built in the mid 1920s.

The D.7 was a conventionally laid-out monoplane, with a thick cantilever shoulder wing.Its single seat,open cockpit,provided with a small windscreen,was over the wing.
It had conventional, fixed, tailskid landing gear.
The D.7 could be powered by any small engine; the Salmson AD.3 radial engine, the Clerget 2K flat twin, Vaslin flat-four or Vaslin water-cooled six cylinder inline engines were fitted.

Performance was leisurely to say the least,12hp gave top speed of 55mph.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2019, 06:11:05 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #198 on: July 24, 2019, 06:28:07 PM »
Dewoitine D.19

The Dewoitine D.19 was a fighter aircraft built in France in 1925 in response to a French Air Force request.
A development of the D.1, the D.19 shared the D.1's parasol-wing configuration,but featured an all-new wing of increased span,and had double the engine power.

It was rejected by the French Air Force,but a demonstration for the Swiss government in August 1925 led to an order for three aircraft.
One example was sold to Belgium, incorporating changes requested by the Swiss which included a change in the wing (more similar to the D.1), and the replacement of the radiators with a more conventional frontal radiator.

Powerplant was a Hispano-Suiza 12Jb V-12 water-cooled piston engine of 400 hp,which gave it a top speed of around 160mph.It was equipped with a pair fixed,forward-firing 7.7 mm (0.30 in) machine-guns.
The first Swiss D.19 was entirely constructed by Dewoitine in France, the remaining two aircraft were supplied to be assembled by the Swiss factory EKW. The aircraft were used for many years by the Swiss Fliegertruppe as trainers for fighter pilots, remaining in service until 1940. Just five aircraft were completed.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2019, 06:29:39 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #199 on: July 25, 2019, 09:19:14 PM »
Dewoitine D.26

The Dewoitine D.26 was a military trainer developed in Switzerland for the Swiss Air Force in parallel with the D.27 fighter.
After the end of WW I, the lack in demand for aircraft forced Dewoitine to close his company and move to Switzerland in 1927.

The D.26 airframe was similar to that of the D.27,differences included the engine cowling was omitted on the D.26;and the radial engine was smaller and produced 340 hp.
it first flew in December 1929,10 examples were built by Dewoitine for assembly by the Swiss factory K+W Thun in Switzerland. These were followed by an order for two more aircraft equipped with a slightly higher-powered version of the Wright 9Q engine that powered the initial batch, and one of the original D.26s was similarly re-engined.

The D.26 enjoyed a long service life, not being withdrawn until 1948. At this time, they were transferred to the Aero-Club der Schweiz where they were used as glider tugs. The last example was not retired from aeroclub use until 1970,it was preserved at the military aviation museum at Dübendorf.
Only 2 planes are still airworthy in original condition, number 286 is based in Grenchen LSZG and number 284 is based in Lausanne LSGL.Both planes touring in airshows as "Patrouille Dewoitine - Swiss Air Force 1931".
« Last Edit: July 25, 2019, 09:19:46 PM by Angry Turnip »