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Author Topic: The slightly less well known  (Read 43580 times)

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Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #350 on: December 29, 2019, 06:15:23 PM »
SPAD S.XX

The S.XX was an upgrade of the S.XVIII and was a two-seat fighter biplane which carried a pilot and tail gunner. The design was fairly conventional, but featured an upper wing with a pronounced sweep-back. This was joined to the lower wing by large I-struts. Like its predecessor, the S.XX became known colloquially as the "Herbemont", after its designer.

Originally the French government issued an open-ended contract for these aircraft at the rate of 300 per month, however, this was cancelled at the Armistice, before any aircraft had been delivered.
The order was later revived to obtain a modern fighter for France's post-war air force, and 95 were purchased. Additionally, the Japanese Mitsubishi company bought three examples, and the government of Bolivia bought one.

In 1918, a S.XX set the world airspeed record for a two-seat aircraft, with a speed of 143 mph.
The standard engine was a 300hp Hispano-Suiza 8Fb inline engine rated for a max speed of 135mph, but several aircraft had custom built engines with airframe tweaks for racing and speed records.
1920 saw S.20s used to break records not only in their own class, but the world absolute airspeed record three times over. On February 28, Jean Casale reached 176 mph, but this was soon broken by Bernard de Romanet, first on October 9 with a speed of 182 mph, and then on November 4 at 193 mph.The same year, the two S.20bis-5s competed in the Gordon Bennett Cup.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2019, 10:43:21 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #351 on: December 30, 2019, 11:11:42 PM »
Sud Aviation

Sud-Aviation was a French state-owned aircraft manufacturer, originating from the merger of Sud-Est SNCASE and Sud-Ouest SNCASO on 1 March 1957. Both companies had been formed from smaller privately owned business`s that had been nationalized into six regional design and manufacturing pools prior to WW II.

Sud Aviation SE-116 Voltigeur

The twin turboprop Sud Aviation SE-116 Voltigeur of the late 1950s was an army support aircraft capable of observation and ground attack operations.
The first prototype had 800 hp Wright Cyclone nine cylinder radial engines mounted ahead of the wing leading edges, with cowlings, largely above the wing, projecting beyond the trailing edge. On the second prototype the Cyclones were replaced with 760 hp Turbomeca Bastan turboprops in much more slender cowlings on the top of the wings.

The aircraft had tricycle gear with main legs that retracted backwards into under-engine cowlings; the nose wheel retracted into the fuselage. Each main leg carried a pair of wheels to assist with operations from rough strips.
The Voltigeur was fitted with two 20 mm (0.79 in) guns and six underwing attachment points for bombs and rockets.The piston-engined Voltigeur was first flown on 5 June 1958 by Roger Carpentier who also took the turboprop version on its first flight on 15 December 1958.

A few weeks later, on 9 January 1959, Carpentier, Yves Crouzet and Marcel Hochet were killed when tail flutter developed in a high-speed run. After tests of the SE-117 first pre-production machine, conducted in collaboration with Marcel Dassault, the Voltigeur programme was abandoned with just three aircraft completed.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2019, 11:12:15 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #352 on: December 31, 2019, 01:51:03 PM »
Voisin III

The Voisin III was a French World War I two-seat pusher biplane multi-purpose aircraft.

The first Voisin III was powered by a 130 hp Salmson M9 engine water-cooled 9 cylinder radial engine, later examples used the similar 150 hp Salmson P9 or R9.
It had a range of 120 miles, a top speed of 65–70 mph and a ceiling of 10,990–19,690 ft depending on engine and manufacturer.
The pilot sat ahead of the passenger, who could fire weapons, release bombs or take photos,some versions could carry up to 330lbs of bombs. It incorporated a light steel frame structure which made it highly durable when operating out of makeshift wartime military aviation airfields.

It became one of the most common Allied bombers early in the war. Significant numbers were purchased by the French and the Imperial Russian Air Force. Russia ordered more than 800 from France and built a further 400 under license and over 100 were built in Italy and 50 in the United Kingdom.Small numbers were purchased by Belgium and Romania. One French aircraft was forced to land in Switzerland in 1915 after running low on fuel in combat with a German aircraft and was put into service with the Swiss Fliegerabteilung.

Like many aircraft of its era, Voisin III was a multi-purpose aircraft. Its missions included day- and night bombing, reconnaissance, artillery spotting and training.
It is notable for being the aircraft used for the first successful shooting down of an enemy aircraft on October 5, 1914, and to have been used to equip the first dedicated bomber units, in September 1914.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2020, 05:39:42 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #353 on: January 01, 2020, 05:49:47 PM »
Voisin VI

The Voisin VI or Voisin Type 6 was a French pusher biplane bomber aircraft of World War I.

The first Voisin Type VI entered service in 1916 and replaced the Voisin III on the production lines. However, the Voisin 155 hp Salmson engines were held in low regard by their crews.
Despite the more powerful engine, the Voisin Type VIs' payload was only marginally better and the maximum speed was only a very sedate 70 mph- not enough improvement to make a difference, while climb rate suffered substantially.

A single Voisin Type VI was fitted with a second Salmson in the nose of the fuselage, driving a tractor propeller. It is believed that the intention was to test a possible twin pusher and tractor propellor configuration for a new bomber planned by Voisin.
Approximately 50 Voisin Type VIs were built, and these served alongside the Voisin Type IIIs during 1916.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2020, 05:50:11 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #354 on: January 01, 2020, 06:04:18 PM »
Voisin XII

The Voisin XII was a prototype French two-seat four-engine biplane bomber built near the end of the First World War.

The Voisin XII was a long-range night bomber with four 220hp Hispano-Suiza 8Bc V-8 water-cooled piston engines mounted in pairs in tandem.
The aircraft was built in response to the BN2 requirement for a long-range night bomber. Just one prototype was built and test flights were successful, but the war's end prevented the Voisin XII from being ordered into production.
The aircraft had a max speed of 90mph and a range of just over 430 miles. It had a 7.7 mm (0.303 in) Lewis gun, with the option for one 37 mm (1.457 in) Hotchkiss cannon, and could carry a bombload of around 1,800lbs.

It was the last aircraft Voisin produced, After WWI, Gabriel Voisin abandoned the aviation industry in favor of vehicle construction under the name Avions Voisin.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2020, 06:05:04 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #355 on: January 02, 2020, 06:09:27 PM »
Wassmer WA-40 Series

Wassmer was a woodworking company formed by Bernard Wassmer in 1905, which later became an aircraft manufacturer specializing in gliders.

The Wassmer WA-40 Super 4 Sancy is a French single-engined light aircraft of the 1960s and 70s. It was a low-winged monoplane with a retractable nosewheel undercarriage. The fuselage was of steel tube construction with fabric covering, while the wings were wooden. The first prototype flew on 8 June 1959,and received French certification on 9 June 1960.
With the 53rd production aircraft ( in 1963 ), a swept vertical fin and rudder were introduced (designated WA.40A; first flew in January 1963 and receiving French certification in March 1963); all further units produced continued the swept design.

In 1965 the WA.41, with fixed landing gear was introduced, named Baladou. In March 1967 the Super 4/21 Prestige was introduced, powered by a 235 hp Lycoming O-540 engine, it also featured a variable-pitch propeller, autopilot, and IFR instrumentation. Wassmer suffered financial difficulty in early 1977, and became insolvent in September 1977.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 06:12:15 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #356 on: January 03, 2020, 06:37:49 PM »
Wassmer WA-80

The Wassmer WA-80 Piranha is a French two-seat low-wing cabin monoplane trainer.It had a similar construction as the company's WA-50 four-seater, however the WA-80 was a scaled down version.
The prototype, registered F-WVKR, first flew in November 1975 powered by a 100 hp Rolls-Royce Continental O-200 engine.Wassmer appointed a receiver and suspended production in 1977 after 25 had been built.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2020, 06:39:05 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #357 on: January 03, 2020, 06:55:45 PM »
Wassmer Cerva CE.43 Guépard Series.

Wassmer decided to produce an alternate all-metal version of the Wassmer WA.4/21. He teamed up with Siren SA to form a joint-company known as Consortium Europeén de Réalisation et de Ventes d'Avions (CERVA). The two aircraft have identical dimensions but the all-metal Guépard is heavier.

The prototype first flew on 18 May 1971 and was exhibited at the 1971 Paris Air Show. The aircraft was certified on 1 June 1972,and the French government ordered 26 aircraft, eight for the Navy, and 18 for the Airforce.
First deliveries to private customers began in 1975 and by the time production ended in 1976 44 aircraft had been produced with some being exported including to Finland.

Components for the Guépard were manufactured by Siren and final assembly, equipment fit and flight testing was carried out by Wassmer at Issoire.
Two new versions were developed, the CE.44 Couguar powered by a 285 hp Continental Tiara 6-285 engine, and the CE.45 Léopard powered by a 310 hp Avco Lycoming TIO-540.
Development ended when the Wassmer went into liquidation in 1977.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2020, 06:57:33 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #358 on: January 04, 2020, 05:43:37 PM »
Well, that is France done, time to move on to Spain.

Aeronáutica Industrial S.A. is a Spanish aeronautical company. It took over another company, Talleres Loring which had been founded by Jorge Loring in 1923.

AISA González Gil-Pazó GP-1

The González Gil-Pazó GP-1 was a single-engine, two-seat open cockpit training aircraft, built in Spain in the 1930s to compete for a government contract.

The Gil-Pazo No1 was a low-wing cantilever monoplane, built of wood and metal with plywood skinning, seated two and had an unfaired conventional undercarriage. It was powered by an ADC Cirrus engine. Almost no specifications are known, but it first flew in June 1932 and was last recorded at Cuatro Vientos, Madrid in July 1936.

In 1934 a specification for a two-seat trainer was issued and Gil-Pazó's response was a development of the No1,named GP-1. The aircraft had two open cockpits and a trousered undercarriage was similar to the Miles Hawk Major in appearance. Its wings, of semi-elliptic plan, had a wooden structure and a stressed plywood skin.For its first flight in June 1934 it was powered by the same Cirrus engine as the No.1 but this was replaced by a 195 hp Walter Junior inverted inline engine for the competition.

The Gil-Pazó GP-1 was the winner, and in 1936 González Gil and Pazó received an order for 100 aircraft. These were to be built by AISA but none of these had been completed by July 1936 at the start of the Spanish Civil War.
AISA retreated to Alicante. About forty GP-1s were built there during the war in a collaboration with Hispano-Suiza.About thirty of the forty GP-1s built at Alicante were captured by the Nationalist forces and given military serials. After the war at least twelve of these were given Spanish civil registrations; one remained on the register until 1961.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2020, 11:06:28 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #359 on: January 05, 2020, 05:23:16 PM »
(AISA) INTA HM.1 Series

The INTA HM.1, also known as Huarte Mendicoa HM-1, was a 1940s Spanish primary trainer designed by the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeronáutica (INTA) and built by (AISA).

The HM.1 was a two-seat primary training monoplane with a fixed tailwheel landing gear. It was followed by a number of similar aircraft with equipment and accommodation changes.
The last of the family was the HM.7 built in 1947 which was an enlarged four-seat version powered by a 240 hp Argus As 10C engine, the HM.7 was the last powered aircraft designed by the Institute.

The HM.1 first flew in 1943 and had a fixed undercarriage.Later models had enclosed cockpits and retractable gear.It soldiered on in Spanish service till the end of the 1950’s, it was not a very successful aircraft and had a reputation for poor handling,especially spin recovery.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2020, 05:23:59 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #360 on: January 06, 2020, 06:18:16 PM »
AISA I-11

The I-11 was a Spanish built two-seat civil utility aircraft from the 1950s.

The original design was by another Spanish aircraft company Iberavia, its first of two prototype flew on 16 July 1951. Iberavia was acquired by AISA before the aircraft had gone into production.
It was a low-wing monoplane with a fixed, tricycle undercarriage and a large, bubble canopy over the two side-by-side seats.

AISA decided to continue with development, but made some changes to the design, reducing the size of the canopy, and replacing the undercarriage with a taildragger arrangement. This configuration entered production in 1952 with an order from the Director General for Civil Aviation for 70 aircraft for use in Spain's aeroclubs. The Spanish Air Force then ordered 125 for use in training.
It was powered by a 90hp Continental C90-12F Four-cyliner air-cooled engine, which was good for a max speed of 125mph with a cruise of 110mph.
The Air Force later requested 200 aircraft, but with tandem seating, which were designated I-115 and powered by a 150 hp ENMA Tigre inverted air-cooled engine.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2020, 06:19:39 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #361 on: January 07, 2020, 07:46:57 PM »
AISA I-115

The AISA I-115 is a low-wing single-engined military primary trainer with tandem seating, which went into service with the Spanish Air Force in 1956.
The I-115 was a development of the I-11B, but was a longer machine because the SAF wanted tandem seating for its trainers, had a slightly greater span and was considerably heavier.
These changes called for more power, so the I-115 used a 150 hp ENMA Tigre inverted in-line engine.The first prototype flew on 20 June 1952.

About 200 I-115s were delivered to the SAF, 150 by the Spring of 1956; at that time there was an order for another 150. They were initially known as the type EE.6, but became the E.9 which was in service from 1956 to 1976. Despite the long service, there was criticism of its spinning behaviour and its weight.
Most E.9s were powered by the Tigre engine but some late models had the 145 hp de Havilland Gipsy Major engine and others a 190 hp Lycoming O-435-A.

Many I-115s were sold to civilians at the end of their military service and in 2014 seven were still on the Spanish civil register. Three of these were in museums but were active until at least 2009
« Last Edit: January 07, 2020, 10:33:49 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #362 on: January 08, 2020, 10:06:20 PM »
Aerotécnica AC-12

The Aerotécnica AC-12 Pepo was a Spanish two-seat light helicopter of the 1950s.

It was designed by Jean Cantinieau and like his other designs featured a distinctive "spine" above the fuselage pod that carried the engine ahead of the rotor assembly. Development costs were subsidised by the Spanish government, and the first of two prototypes flew on 20 July 1954.
Power was supplied by a 168 hp Lycoming O-360-B2A air-cooled flat-four engine.Twelve aircraft (two prototypes and 10 production) were ordered for the Spanish Air Force where they served for three years under the designation EC-XZ-2.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2020, 10:07:15 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #363 on: January 09, 2020, 05:09:15 PM »
Aerotécnica AC-14

The Aerotécnica AC-14 was a Spanish five-seat light helicopter of the 1950s, designed by Jean Cantinieau.

The AC-14 continued Cantinieau`s practice of mounting the engine ahead of the main rotor, and like the Norelfe, used the ducted exhaust from the turboshaft to counter the torque of the main rotor at low speeds, while at high speeds the exhaust gases were deflected rearwards to increase speed, torque being compensated for by movable twin tail fins.
The first of prototype flew on 16 July 1957. Power was from a 400hp Turbomeca Artouste IIB engine, which gave a max speed of 110mph and a cruise of 92mph.
A pre-production order for ten aircraft was placed by the Spanish Air Force where they served designation EC-XZ-4. No production followed, as they were costly compared to used Bell 47G-2 and G-3.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2020, 05:09:33 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #364 on: January 09, 2020, 05:27:07 PM »
CASA III

Construcciones Aeronáuticas SA (CASA) was founded by José Ortiz-Echagüe in 1923.

The CASA III was a 1920s Spanish two-seat monoplane.

In 1929 using experience from the production of licence-built aircraft the company built the CASA III. It was originally designed as a light bomber monoplane for the Aeronáutica Naval air arm of the Spanish Navy, but its performance was poor the prototypes ending up as trainers at Pollensa´s Naval Air School.
The CASA III was a parasol wing monoplane with a fabric-covered steel tube fuselage. It had tandem open cockpits, and wide track fixed conventional landing gear with a tail skid.
The wings were hinged at the rear spar and they could be folded for storage or transport.

The prototype first flew on 2 July 1929 and was powered by a 90 hp Cirrus III piston engine.A total of nine aircraft were built, all with different engines, including the de Havilland Gipsy III and the Elizalde A6 radial engine.The last aircraft built was delivered to the Spanish Navy.
Power plants included:- de Havilland Gipsy I, de Havilland Gipsy II, de Havilland Gipsy III, Isotta Fraschini Asso 80 R., Lorraine 5P, Walter Venus and Elizalde D V.
During the Spanish Civil War all the remaining CASA IIIs were operated by the Republican forces and none survived the conflict.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2020, 05:30:48 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #365 on: January 10, 2020, 10:18:49 PM »
CASA 2.111

The CASA 2.111 was a medium bomber derived from the Heinkel He 111 and produced in Spain under licence.

During the Spanish Civil War, in 1937, the Spanish Nationalist Air Force received a number of He 111Es. There was a requirement for more modern aircraft,in 1940, CASA negotiated a contract with Heinkel to produce 200 of the new He 111 H-16 in Seville.Setting up production was slow, with little support from Germany, but Spain managed to locate a store of Jumo 211F-2 engines in France, and this enabled completion of 130 Jumo powered aircraft in three versions, a bomber, reconn bomber and dual trainer.

The first Spanish-built aircraft flew on 23 May 1945. At the end of the war, access to the German-built Junkers engines became a major problem, but CASA found an alternative with the Rolls-Royce Merlin 500. In April 1956, 173 Merlin engines were ordered and installed on the aircraft in a nacelle type originally developed by Rolls-Royce for the Beaufighter II and later on the Avro Lancaster. The newly Merlin-powered bombers and reconnaissance bombers became the 2.111B and 2.111D, respectively.
A nine-passenger transport, the 2.111T8, was also developed and produced.Spanish 2.111s served into the late 1960s and,some of the transports, early 1970s. Many of the aircraft retired in the 1960s, and some were used in films such as Battle of Britain and Patton,due to the resemblance to Heinkel He 111s.

The CASA 2.111 was used in combat in the close air support role during the Ifni War in 1957-1958. Approximately 14 Spanish licensed built CASA 2.111s survive today in various conditions on display or in storage.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2020, 12:55:08 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #366 on: January 11, 2020, 01:34:59 PM »
CASA C.127

The CASA C.127 was license-built version of the Dornier Do 27.STOL Utility Aircraft.

Dornier's facilities in Spain designed the Do 25 to a Spanish military requirement for a light utility aircraft, as a precursor to the production Do 27. Powered by a 150 hp ENMA Tigre G.V engine, the Do 25 was not selected for production.

The Do 27 seated four to six, and the original prototype first flew in Spain on 27 June 1955. Most production aircraft were built in Germany, the first German-built aircraft first flight was on 17 October 1956. 50 more were manufactured in Spain by Construcciones Aeronáuticas SA as the CASA-127. In addition to the military operators in Germany and Spain, Portugal received 40 new-build and 106 ex-German machines.
Powerplant for most models was a 275hp Lycoming GO-480-B1A6 6-cylinder air-cooled horizontally-opposed piston engine.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2020, 01:36:42 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #367 on: January 12, 2020, 04:54:37 PM »
CASA C-201 Alcotán

The CASA C-201 Alcotán ("Kestrel") was a 1950s transport aircraft, for the Spanish Air Force.

The aircraft was the result of an agreement between the Spanish government CASA, to develop a transport aircraft for the air force capable of carrying a payload of one tonne over a range of 1,000 km (620 mi). The design was a twin-engine low-wing cantilever monoplane. The main units of the tailwheel undercarriage retracted into the engine nacelles.

The first of two portotypes flew on 11 February 1949. An order for twelve pre-production aircraft and one hundred series aircraft was then placed. The pre-production machines were planned to demonstrate a range of different equipment fits for the airframe. A number of engines were also to be evaluated, including the 475 hp Armstrong Siddeley Cheetah that had powered the prototypes.
The Pratt & Whitney R-1340, and the locally produced ENMASA Sirio were also used in a number of the aircraft.

Due to problems in the supply of powerplants and propellers, the Alcotan project began to suffer. Spain's domestic engine industry was not capable of producing powerplants in sufficient quantity, and Spain was unable to afford to import foreign engines. The shortage of engines meant that by 1956, only eleven complete aircraft had been finished and delivered.
By 1962, the project was finally cancelled, without the engine problem ever having been resolved. By then, CASA had 96 complete airframes in storage awaiting powerplants, these were scrapped, and the Spanish government compensated the manufacturer.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2020, 04:55:58 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #368 on: January 13, 2020, 07:39:57 PM »
CASA C-202 Halcón

The CASA C-202 Halcón was a twin-engine transport aircraft, from the early 1950`s.

The Halcón was designed for use on Spain's international air routes. It had tricycle landing gear and a heated/air-conditioned cabin which could accommodate fourteen passengers.
Twenty aircraft were initially ordered, and delivered to the Spanish Air Force with the designation T.6.
The aircraft were powered by 2 ENMASA Beta B-41 nine-cylinder air-cooled radial engines, of 775 hp.These allowed a max speed of 233 MPH and a cruise of 208 MPH.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2020, 07:40:16 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #369 on: January 14, 2020, 09:35:32 PM »
CASA C-207 Azor

The CASA C-207 Azor was a transport aircraft and was a scaled-up version of the CASA C-202 Halcón.

It was developed as an airline-suited aircraft, for short- to mid-range routes that were common in Spain and other Europe areas. The Azor was deemed almost obsolete and uneconomical for its time, for which better aircraft were available for its role.

CASA turned to the Spanish Air Force, which had interest in new transport aircraft,and CASA had previously experimented with transport aircraft to replace types already in service, such as the CASA C-201 and CASA C-202. They were plagued with unreliable engines and were cancelled.
The 207A was built for the Air Force with a capacity of 40 passengers plus a crew of four.They were powered by 2 Bristol Hercules 730 radial piston engines of 2040 hp each.
A batch of ten C-207C (or T.7B) were built with large doors and capacity for 37 Paratroops.

Two survivors are at the Spanish Air Force museum, one is at Getafe Air Base, one is preserved in the exterior in Sevilla after a 2015 restoration.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2020, 09:36:19 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #370 on: January 15, 2020, 10:57:42 PM »
CASA C-212 Aviocar

The CASA C-212 Aviocar is a turboprop-powered STOL medium cargo aircraft designed for civil and military use.

CASA introduced the C-212, a twin engined 18 seat transport aircraft that would be capable of fulfilling a variety of military roles, including passenger transport, ambulance aircraft and paratroop carrier, while also being suitable for civil use.The first prototype flew on 26 March 1971. In 1974, the Spanish Air Force decided to acquire the Aviocar to update its fleet.
The C-212 has a high-mounted wing, a box fuselage, and a conventional tail and tricycle undercarriage is non-retractable. It can carry 21–28 passengers depending on configuration. Since the C-212 has an unpressurized fuselage, it is limited to relatively low-flight-level airline usage below 10,000 ft, thus ideal for short legs and regional airline service.

Airlines noted the type's success with the military, so CASA developed a proposed commercial version, the first examples of which were delivered in July 1975.
In August 2006 a total of 30 CASA C-212 aircraft (all variants) remain in airline service around the world. The -400 was introduced in 1997 with a glass cockpit and more powerful engines.
Its operators including numerous charter and short-haul aviation companies and several national air forces. The C-212 is also in the service of the United States Army Special Operations Command with the designation C-41A.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2020, 10:58:12 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #371 on: January 16, 2020, 08:58:02 PM »
Hispano HA-100

The Hispano HA-100 Triana was a military trainer aircraft developed in Spain in the 1950s.

It was the first aircraft designed by Willy Messerschmitt after World War II, and was a conventional, low-wing cantilever tandem monoplane with retractable tricycle undercarriage.
The programme was initiated when the Spanish government issued a requirement in 1951 for a new trainer aircraft. Hispano proposed two versions with different engine power, the HA-100E and HA-100F, the former for basic training, the latter for advanced training, and the construction of two prototypes of each was undertaken.

Development was full of problems with suitable parts, and most particularly with engines. The ENMASA Sirio was originally selected for the HA-100E, but was unavailable, the ENMASA Beta was used instead.
It was a much heavier and powerful engine than had been envisaged for the basic trainer.The performance of this engine was far from satisfactory, and when the second prototype flew in February 1955 (the first HA-100F), it was powered by a Wright R-1300.

Flight testing went well and positive results were achieved, the HA-100 performed well in comparative tests against the American T-28 Trojan, leading to a contract for 40 of the aircraft.
However, obtaining engines remained a stumbling block, with Spain unable to afford to import the Wright engine in quantity. Eventually, production ground to a halt, and the decision was taken to scrap the airframes under construction, salvaging only the wings and empennages for use on the HA-200 project. Just two aircraft were completed.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2020, 08:58:51 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #372 on: January 16, 2020, 09:07:45 PM »
Hispano HS-42

The Hispano HS-42 and its derivative, the HA-43, were advanced military trainer aircraft produced in Spain in the late 1940s.

The basic design was that of a conventional, low-wing, cantilever monoplane with seating for the pilot and instructor in tandem. The HS-42 had fixed, tailwheel undercarriage with spatted mainwheels, while the HA-43 had retractable main units.
It was powered by an Armstrong Siddeley Cheetah 27 seven-cylinder radial engine of 390 hp, which gave a max speed of around 210mph and a cruise of 183mph. It was armed with 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.7 mm Breda-SAFAT machine guns in wings.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2020, 09:08:27 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #373 on: Yesterday at 09:11:51 PM »
Hispano HA-200

The Hispano HA-200 Saeta was a twin-seat jet advanced trainer.

During the early 1950s, Willy Messerschmitt worked on the HA-100 Triana, a piston-engine prototype trainer, the design would subsequently serve as the basis for the HA-200.
The two aircraft directly shared many design features, including the wing, tail unit, and tricycle undercarriage; original elements were largely confined to the area forward of the cockpit.
It was Spain's first indigenously-developed aircraft to be powered by the turbojet engine. On 12 August 1955, the first prototype conducted its maiden flight, flown by Major Valiente, the company's chief test pilot.He praised the prototype's handling qualities, stating them to be light and responsive.

The French Turbomeca Marboré turbojet engine had been selected and Spain had successfully negotiated a license to locally produce the engine. Development was slow and protracted, the first production aircraft, which was designated as HA-200A, first flew during October 1962. Shortly thereafter, the initial version of the aircraft were delivered to the Spanish Air Force; in service, it was operated under the service designation E.14.

The trainer model was shortly followed on by a single-seat version, designated as HA-220, which was designed to perform ground attack missions. On 25 April 1970, this new model made its first flight. During the early 1970s, the ground attack-orientated HA-220 entered into service with the Spanish Air Force, which designated the type as C.10.It remained in service for barely a decade, all of the C.20s being withdrawn from Spanish service by the end of 1981.

During 1959, an agreement was reached so the HA-200 was produced under license in Egypt. Both the airframe and the engines were locally manufactured.A total of 85 HA-200s were reportedly constructed between 1960 and 1969. In Egyptian Air Force service, the type was commonly referred to as the Helwan HA-200B Al-Kahira.
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