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Author Topic: The slightly less well known  (Read 51124 times)

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Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #400 on: February 09, 2020, 03:10:56 PM »
Breda Ba.19

The Breda Ba.19 was a single-seat aerobatic biplane aircraft, later developed as an air force trainer in 1928.

The Ba19 was a single-bay, unequal-span, unstaggered biplane which seated its pilot in an open cockpit. A few Ba.19s were produced as two-seaters with a second open cockpit in tandem.

The aircraft entered service in 1931 and were used throughout the 1930s for display flights by the Squadriglia di Alta Acrobazia Aerea, performing formation aerobatics.
It was powered by a  200hp Alfa Romeo licence-built Armstrong Siddeley Lynx radial engine, which permitted a top speed of 130mph, and a cruise of around 105mph.

Of the 42 built, just one survives,perched in an inverted position in a museum in Trento, NW Italy.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2020, 09:08:19 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #401 on: February 10, 2020, 09:22:52 PM »
Breda Ba.27 / Metallico

The Breda Ba.27 was a fighter produced in the early 1930s.

The Ba.27 was a low-wing braced monoplane, of steel tube construction, skinned with light corrugated alloy metal, it had wooden wings and tailplane. Evaluation of the two prototypes by the Regia Aeronautica in 1933 was very negative, which resulted in an extensive redesign. The fuselage shape was made more rounded and the pilot's open cockpit was moved forward and slightly higher to improve visibility. The corrugated alloy skinning was also replaced with smooth sheet metal.

A prototype of this revised version, known as the Metallico, first flew in June 1934, but it`s appraisal was still disappointing, but despite the lack of domestic interest, the type was ordered by the Republic of China for use against Japan. Out of eighteen machines ordered, only eleven were actually delivered.
Production aircraft were powered by a 540hp Alfa Romeo Mercurius radial engine, which gave the aircraft a top speed of around 235 mph. Armament was 2 fixed, forward-firing 12.7 mm (.5 in) Breda-SAFAT machine guns.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2020, 09:23:14 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #402 on: February 11, 2020, 07:02:33 PM »
Breda Ba.32

The Breda Ba.32 was an airliner prototype from 1931.

The Ba.32 prototype first flew in 1931, It was a low-wing trimotor monoplane with fixed, spatted main landing gear. It was powered by three 320hp Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior nine-cylinder air-cooled radial engines. It had a crew of two, and its cabin could accommodate up to 10 passengers.

Despite displaying good flight characteristics, no production orders ensued and no further examples were built.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2020, 07:02:55 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #403 on: February 11, 2020, 07:12:32 PM »
Breda Ba.44

The Breda Ba.44 was a biplane airliner developed in the mid-1930s.

The Ba.44 was developed from the de Havilland Dragon Rapide, which Breda had purchased a manufacturing licence for. Breda believed some changes would better suit the aircraft to the company's manufacturing techniques, the biggest differences in the prototype Ba.44 was the design of the cockpit and empennage, and the change to locally produced Colombo S.63 engines.
In production, however, these were changed back to the same 185 hp de Havilland Gipsy Six engines as the Dragon Rapide.

Four examples were purchased by Ala Littoria, which used it on its Albanian routes, while the prototype was sold to the Regia Aeronautica, which operated it as a VIP transport and air ambulance in Libya. The excellent performance of the aircraft in this role led to the air force impressing the civil Ba.44s in 1936.

The government of Paraguay purchased one Ba.44 for its Military Aviation in 1933 and it was used as an air ambulance/transport in the Chaco War. In 1945, this Ba.44 was transferred to the first Paraguayan Airline, L.A.T.N. (Líneas Aéreas de Transporte Nacional) and was withdrawn from service in 1947.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2020, 07:13:00 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #404 on: February 12, 2020, 08:50:21 PM »
Breda Ba.64

The Breda Ba.64 was a single-engine ground-attack aircraft used by the Regia Aeronautica during the 1930s.

The Ba.64 was designed in 1933 to requirements set out by the Regia Aeronautica.They wanted an aircraft able to undertake multiple roles: fighter, bomber and reconnaissance.
It was an all-metal, low-wing monoplane with a wire braced tail unit and fixed tail wheel. The open cockpit was placed forward on the fuselage in line with the wing roots to provide an excellent field of vision down as well as forward.

Two prototypes powered by a 700 hp Bristol Pegasus were developed, the first as a two-seater bomber with an armament of four 7.7 mm (0.303 in) machine guns in the wings and up to 400 kg (882 lb) of bombs in racks under the wings.The second was a single-seater fighter configuration fitted with a semi-retractable main landing gear that when in its rearward retracted position, provided less drag as well as protection in case of a wheels-up landing.

The first prototype flew in 1934 but testing revealed a disappointing performance despite the use of a variable-pitch, three-blade propeller. A limited production order was placed for a composite variant that combined the two-place configuration of the bomber with the semi-retractable fighter landing gear. The production variant was powered by a 650 hp Alfa Romeo 125C and although single-seat variants were built, all the Ba.64s were converted to two-place bomber/attack aircraft with a single 7.7 mm (0.303 in) machine gun mounted in the rear cockpit. Production of the 42 Ba.64s was complete by 1936.

They saw limited use in front-line service, the Ba.64s were relegated to second-line duties although a small number survived until March 1943.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2020, 08:51:08 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #405 on: February 13, 2020, 08:43:27 PM »
Breda Ba.79S

The Breda Ba.79S was a four-seater private aircraft from the late 1930s.

It was a single-engined high-wing monoplane with a well equipped cabin for four. The wings were joined to the upper fuselage and braced with streamlined struts.The wings had almost straight leading edges with taper on the trailing edges and rounded tips. The tailplane was mounted at mid-fuselage height and was braced to the rounded fin, which carried a wide chord and unbalanced rudder. The tail surfaces were fabric over wooden frames.

The aircraft was powered by a 200 hp Alfa-Romeo 115 six-cylinder inverted inline engine,which gave the Breda 79 a long-nose look. It had a two-bladed propeller, max speed was an impressive 155mph.
The fuselage was a fabric-covered welded steel structure,behind the engine and under the wings was the cabin with four seats in two rows of two.Glazing was extensive, including a roof window, and the cabin was both thermally and acoustically insulated with controllable ventilation.
The divided undercarriage had widely splayed legs attached at the bottom of the wing bracing struts, carrying semi-spatted wheels.

The first Breda 79, c/n 78001 was registered as I-ABFU on 20 April 1936 together with a second example, I-ABFT c/n 78002 but it is not known when they first flew. Records are sketchy, but three seem to have been flown and used by the Ministero Aeronautica.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2020, 08:46:57 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #406 on: February 14, 2020, 09:59:51 PM »
Breda Ba.88

The Breda Ba.88 Lince ( Lynx ) was a ground-attack aircraft used by the Italian Regia Aeronautica during World War II.

The aircraft was designed to fulfill a 1936 requirement by the Regia Aeronautica for a heavy fighter bomber capable of a maximum speed of 325+ mph, armament of 20 mm cannons and range of 1,240 mi.The Ba.88 was an all-metal, twin-engine, two-crew monoplane,and it first flew in October 1936. The project was derived from the aborted Ba.75.

It was powered by two 1000hp Piaggio P.XI air-cooled radial engines, and drove two three-blade, continuous-speed 10.4 ft diameter Breda propellers. The engine nacelles also carried the two main undercarriage units. The aircraft had a twin tail to provide the dorsal 7.7 mm (0.303 in) Breda-SAFAT machine gun with a better field of fire.
The aircraft had three nose-mounted 12.7 mm (0.5 in) Breda machine guns and another Breda (7.7 mm/0.303 in caliber, with 250-500 rounds) with a high arc of fire, was fitted in the rear cockpit and controlled by a complex motorised electrical system. A modern "San Giorgio" reflector gunsight was fitted, and there was also provision to mount a 20 mm cannon instead of the central Breda-SAFAT machine gun in the nose.

Production numbers of the first series (started in 1939) were 81 machines made by Breda, and 24 by IMAM . The first series included eight trainers, with an elevated second pilot's seat. This was one of the few combat aircraft to have a dedicated trainer version, but it was not enough to prevent the overall failure of the programme.

The second series totalled 19 Breda and 24 IMAM machines fitted with small engine cowling rings. There was a limited evolution in this series, with the second series mainly being sent straight to the scrapyard.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2020, 10:03:03 PM by Angry Turnip »