Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: The slightly less well known  (Read 67243 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #450 on: May 20, 2020, 07:14:55 PM »
Fiat G.2

The Fiat G.2 was an Italian three-engine six-passenger monoplane transport aircraft designed by Giuseppe Gabrielli.

The aircraft was an important step for the Fiat company as their first low-wing cantilever monoplane. The structure was all-metal, with fabric-covered control surfaces. It had a wide-track tailwheel undercarriage was fixed, and its mainwheels were covered by spats. The tailwheel was free-pivoting.

The aircraft was powered by three 135 hp Fiat A.60 inline piston engines, one mounted on the fuselage nose, and two in wing-mounted nacelles. Variants were also produced with other engine installations. The enclosed cabin had space for six passengers.

The prototype first flew in 1932, max speed was 145 mph with a cruise of 115 mph, the G.2 represented a promising design, however it failed to sell and operated only a limited service with the ALI airline between Turin and Milan. The aircraft was also operated in Brazil.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2020, 07:15:31 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #451 on: May 21, 2020, 06:25:06 PM »
Fiat G.5

The Fiat G.5 was an Italian two-seat aerobatic tourer / trainer.

The aircraft first flew in 1933, powered by a 135 hp Fiat A.70 radial piston engine.It was designed originally as a two-seat light aerobatic trainer, it was a low-wing cantilever monoplane with fixed tailwheel landing gear and tandem open cockpits for the instructor and pupil.

It was built in small numbers and was followed by a prototype G.5/2 with an inverted inline 140 hp Fiat A.60. A small number were also built of the G.5bis which was fitted with a higher output 200 hp Fiat A.70 engine. This gave a max speed of 165 mph, and a cruise of 130 mph.
Some aircraft were later modified to single-seat configuration.One example of the G.5bis, registered I-BFFI, survived in civil ownership and operation until 1955 and is now preserved in a museum.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 06:26:04 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #452 on: May 21, 2020, 11:53:44 PM »
Fiat G.8

The Fiat G.8 was a military utility aircraft from the mid-1930s.

The design and production took place at the CMASA works in Pisa which became part of Fiat in 1930, the type is sometimes referred to as the CMASA G.8 or Fiat-CMASA G.8.
It was a conventional biplane design with staggered wings of unequal span braced by struts,The pilot and a single passenger (or instructor) sat in tandem open cockpits, and the aircraft was fitted with fixed tailskid undercarriage with divided main units.

The powerplant was a 135 hp Fiat A.54 engine, which was good for a max speed of 132 mph, with a cruise of 110 mph. The aircraft first flew 24th Feb 1934, 60 aircraft were purchased by the Regia Aeronautica and used for liaison and training duties.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 11:54:04 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #453 on: May 22, 2020, 08:37:43 PM »
Fiat G.12

The Fiat G.12 was an Italian transport aircraft of World War II.

The G.12 was an all-metal low-wing transport aircraft. It had three 770 hp Fiat A.74 R.C.42 radial engines, one mounted on the nose and the other two in wing-mounted nacelles.
It first flew 15th October 1940, 104 were built and the last aircraft retired from service in 1956.
The engines drove three-blade feathering metal propellers. The mainwheels of its landing gear retracted into the nacelles; the tailwheel was fixed.Later versions had Alfa Romeo 128 radial engines.

The flight deck and cabin were fully enclosed. Access was via a door to the rear of the wing.The aircraft had a crew of four, and could carry 14 troops or 24 passengers,depending on the variant.
The G.12 was designed as a civil aircraft, but served mainly in military roles during the war, with Italy, Germany and Hungary. Only a limited number were built, some as late as 1944, after the Italian armistice. 104 were built in total.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 08:38:49 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #454 on: May 22, 2020, 08:53:47 PM »
Fiat G.18

The Fiat G.18 was an Italian airliner developed in the mid-1930s.

It`s first flight was 18th March 1935, but the feedback received was that the type was underpowered, the first three aircraft had 700 hp Fiat A.59 radial engines.
It was a low-wing monoplane with the engines mounted on the wings, similar in appearance to the Douglas DC-2. The main units of the tailwheel undercarriage retracted into the engine nacelles, leaving their wheels partially exposed. The cabin seated 18 passengers.

Three G.18s were put into service with Fiat's own airline, ALI, early in 1936. Fiat came up with a revised version, the G.18V which had more powerful engines 1000hp FIAT A.80`s , and a redesigned fin . Six of the improved versions were delivered to ALI, which operated them on its European routes until the outbreak of war.
In June 1940, ALI was under control of the Regia Aeronautica, and the G.18s were put to use as transports. Just nine aircraft were completed, and none survived the war.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 08:54:23 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #455 on: May 23, 2020, 02:16:49 PM »
Fiat G.49

The Fiat G.49 was a two-seat basic trainer designed by Giuseppe Gabrielli .

It was to be a replacement for the US North American T-6 advanced trainer and was first flown in September 1952. The aircraft was an all-metal low-wing monoplane with retractable tailwheel landing gear. It had an enclosed cockpit with a raised canopy for a pupil and instructor in tandem. Two variants were built with different engine types ; the G.49-1 with a 550 hp Alvis Leonides radial engine and the G.49-2 with a 600 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1340-S3H1 Wasp radial engine.

The aircraft was evaluated by the Italian Air Force, but no orders were placed despite the good overall performance.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 02:17:31 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #456 on: May 23, 2020, 02:30:48 PM »
Fiat G.80 / G.82


The Fiat G.80 was a military jet trainer developed in the 1950s.

It was italy`s first true jet-powered aircraft, a conventional low-wing monoplane with retractable tricycle undercarriage and engine air intakes on the fuselage sides.Pilot and instructor sat in tandem under a long bubble canopy.The aircraft made it`s first flight 9th December 1951.

Two G.80 prototypes were followed by three preproduction machines, but the Aeronautica Militare found it unsuitable for their requirements and did not purchase it in quantity.
Fiat developed an improved version, dubbed the G.82, for entry in a NATO competition to select a standard jet trainer.

The G.82 featured a longer fuselage, a Rolls-Royce Nene engine in place of the G.80's de Havilland Goblin, and wingtip tanks. Five aircraft were built, but the competition was cancelled,the G.82 was not selected by NATO or the Aeronautica Militare, the development programme was ended.
The G.82s were used for a few years by the Aeronautica Militare's training school at Amendola before being handed over to the ("Department of Experimental Flight") in 1957.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 02:33:14 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #457 on: May 24, 2020, 05:08:28 PM »
Fiat G.212

The Fiat G.212 was a tri-engine airliner of the 1940s.

It was a scaled up development of Fiat's earlier G.12 transport, and was used in small numbers in commercial service and by the Italian Air Force.
The first prototype G.212, the G.212CA military transport, flew on 19 January 1947. It was a low-wing all-metal monoplane with a retractable tailwheel undercarriage, the G.212 was longer, and had a larger wing and a wider fuselage, than the G.12. It was powered by three 860 hp Alfa Romeo 128 radial engines.

It was followed by two civil version, the G.212CP airliner, with accommodation for 34 passengers, and the G.212TP freighter, both used the more powerful 1065 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp engines.Max speed was 240 mph with a cruise of 190 mph, the aircraft had two pilots and a radio operator.

The G.212CP entered service in 1947 with Avio Linee Italiane which ordered six, which operated on routes within Europe.
New G.212s were also bought by the Egyptian airline SAIDE, which received three aircraft in 1948, and the French airline Cie Air Transport. Four of the Avio Linee Italiane aircraft were sold to Ali Flotte Riunite, one of which was sold again to the Kuwaiti airline Arabian Desert Airlines. In total 45 machines were completed.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2020, 05:09:08 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #458 on: May 25, 2020, 05:37:17 PM »
Fiat B.R. Series.

The Fiat B.R. 1/4 was a light bomber series, desgined just after WWI.

The B.R was a development of the SIA 9 reconnaissance aircraft, but the aircraft had substantial strengthening. The layout was identical to its predecessor: a two-bay biplane with tandem, open cockpits for pilot and observer, and tailskid undercarriage. Shortly after entering service with the Regia Aeronautica, an improved version using the Warren truss-style bracing that would become a hallmark of Fiat BR designs over the next decade, was produced.

At its peak, the BR equipped 15 light bomber squadrons of the Regia Aeronautica. Two examples were also exported to Sweden, and one to Hungary.
In 1922, a specially modified BR designated the R.700 was used to set the absolute world airspeed record at 336 km/h (210 mph).
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 10:14:12 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #459 on: May 25, 2020, 05:50:32 PM »
Fiat C.29

The Fiat C.29 was a racing seaplane designed by Celestino Rosatelli and built in the late-1920s by Fiat Aviazione for the 1929 Schneider Trophy air race.

It first flew in early June 1929, the twin-float monoplane racer was reported to be laterally unstable. Unusually, the wing structure featured a wooden spar but was skinned with aluminium alloy sheeting. The aircraft used the 1010 hp Fiat AS.5 V-12 engine, specifically designed for this aircraft to minimise frontal area.

On 12 June 1929, Test Pilot Francesco Agello hit the wash of a boat whilst landing causing the first prototype, works number 129, to bounce in the air, stall and dive vertically into the water. Agello was rescued unharmed after being thrown out of the cockpit. The second prototype, 130, was quickly completed, this aircraft having larger tail surfaces to correct the stability problems.

On 12 August 1929, whilst demonstrating the aircraft, the second prototype was written off after sinking back onto the water on its third attempt at a takeoff, Agello was uninjured, but the aircraft was destroyed, the engine sank to the bottom of Lake Garda.
Italo Balbo ordered a third aircraft to be built, 130bis, and sent directly to England without being test-flown for the approaching Schneider Trophy competition. The C.29 did appear at RAF Calshot but did not fly during the competition, the Italian team placing second, fourth and sixth using Macchi M.52 and M.67 racers. The third and sole remaining C.29 is on display at the Italian Air Force Museum.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 10:13:33 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #460 on: May 26, 2020, 08:18:30 PM »
Fiat CR.25

The Fiat CR.25 was a twin-engine reconnaissance-bomber fighter aircraft which served in small numbers for the Regia Aeronautica during World War II.

40 CR.25s were ordered (later reduced to ten, the two prototypes and other eight airplanes) after the failure of the Breda Ba.88 bomber. It was decided to use the CR.25 as a reconnaissance plane and escort fighter, with a total of nine aircraft (a prototype and the eight pre-production aircraft) for this role. Despite positive reports from the pilots, and a proposal by Fiat to resume production, no further aircraft were produced.

The aircraft first flew 22nd July 1937, it had a crew of 2 or 3 depending on the role.It was powered by two 841 hp Fiat A.74 R.C.38 14-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines, which gave it a max speed of 280 mph. It was armed with 3 12.7 mm (0.500 in) Breda-SAFAT machine guns and could carry a small bomb load of up to 300kg.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2020, 08:24:34 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #461 on: May 26, 2020, 08:35:23 PM »
Fiat CR.30

The Fiat CR.30 was a 1930s Italian single-seat biplane fighter aircraft.

The Fiat CR.30 was a design by Celestino Rosatelli for a single-seat fighter. Four prototypes were built with the first flight occurring in March 1932. The CR.30 was a biplane with W-form struts and a fixed tailwheel landing gear.
The aircraft was powered by a 600 hp Fiat A.30 R.A. V-12 piston engine. The impressive performance led to orders from the Regia Aeronautica for 121 aircraft.

Two of the prototypes were converted into two-seaters designated CR.30B for use as trainers and liaison aircraft. A large number of single-seaters were converted into two-seaters as they were replaced with more modern types.The air force later ordered an additional 20 new-build CR.30Bs.The aircraft was also operated by other European air forces with the Hungarian Air Force being the largest foreign operator, using two CR.30s from 1936 and one single-seater and ten CR.30bs from 1938.

In total 176 were built in a production run that lasted from 1932 to 1935.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2020, 08:35:45 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #462 on: Yesterday at 06:08:09 PM »
Fiat R.2

The Fiat R.2 was a reconnaissance aircraft produced shortly after World War I, and it was the first aircraft to be marketed under the Fiat brand, (previously they had been marketed as by SIA).

It was a conventional two-bay biplane with equal-span, with unstaggered wings and fixed tailskid undercarriage. The pilot and observer sat in tandem open cockpits. The design was a derivative of the SIA 7 and SIA 9 flown during the war, but was developed and revised by Rosatelli to correct ongoing problems with those types. A total of 129 were produced for the Air Corps of the Regio Esercito.
The aircraft was powered by a 300 hp Fiat A.12bis engine, which gave a max speed of 108 mph. They were armed with between 1 and 3 machine guns
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 06:08:27 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 11733
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #463 on: Yesterday at 06:23:26 PM »
FIAT A.120

The FIAT A.120 also known as the Ansaldo A.120, FIAT (Fabbrica Italiana Automobili Torino - ) bought Ansaldo, was a reconnaissance aircraft developed in the 1920s.
It was a parasol-wing monoplane with fixed tailskid undercarriage, the crew of pilot and observer had tandem open cockpits. The design was based on a wing developed for the Ansaldo A.115 and the fuselage of the Dewoitine D.1 fighters that Ansaldo had built under licence.
The type was operated in modest quantities by the Italian Air Force, and was exported to the air forces of Austria and Lithuania.

The aircraft was powered by a 550 hp Fiat A.22 piston engine, which gave a max speed of 158 mph and a cruise of 125 mph. It was armed by 2 fixed, forward-firing 7.7. mm machine guns and a similar rear firing weapon for the observer.A total of 77 aircraft were built.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 06:25:03 PM by Angry Turnip »