Author Topic: The slightly less well known  (Read 114613 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 12293
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #800 on: February 21, 2021, 05:21:39 PM »
Gotha Go 244

The Gotha Go 244 was a transport aircraft used by the Luftwaffe during World War II.

The Go 244 was the powered version of the Gotha Go 242 military glider transport. Three Go 242s were modified as prototypes of the powered Go 244, fitted with varying surplus radial engines. The first prototype, the Go 244 V1 was powered by two 660 hp BMW 132, while the second prototype had 700 hp Gnome-Rhône 14Ms — and the third 750 hp Shvetsov M-25 A engines,which was a Soviet-built Wright Cyclone American-based nine-cylinder radial. Although only the third prototype offered adequate engine out performance, the Luftwaffe had large stocks of captured Gnome engines, so this was chosen as the basis for the production conversion — usually fitted in counter-rotating pairs in production.

The B series was the main production model, based on the Go 242B with a wheeled tricycle undercarriage and with fuel and oil carried in the tailbooms.133 were converted from Go 242 Bs,while a further 41 were built from new before production ended.
The first examples were delivered to operational units in Greece, based in Crete in March 1942. Some were also assigned to transport Geschwader in North Africa and the Eastern Front but they proved vulnerable to anti-aircraft fire and were withdrawn, being replaced by other types.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2021, 05:22:02 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 12293
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #801 on: February 22, 2021, 01:54:11 PM »
Gyroflug Speed Canard

The Gyroflug SC 01 Speed Canard is an unconventional layout sports plane produced in Germany in the 1980s and 1990s.

It was inspired by the Rutan VariEze, the Speed Canard was an all-new design created without any input from Rutan. Like the VariEze, the Speed Canard is a canard-configured mid-wing monoplane with wingtip fins that incorporate rudders. The two-seat tandem cockpit and canopy design were derived from Grob Twin Astir sailplane, and the nosewheel of the tricycle undercarriage is retractable. Construction throughout is of composite materials, the design attained German certification in 1983, making it the first composite canard design to achieve certification anywhere in the world.

An interesting feature is that the twin rudders operate independently, allowing both rudders to be deflected outwards simultaneously, cancelling each other's yaw, but acting as airbrakes. The aircraft is powered by a 160hp Lycoming O-320-D1A air-cooled flat-four piston engine, giving a max speed of 183 mph and a cruise of 170mph. As of 1995 62 aircraft had been completed.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2021, 01:54:27 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 12293
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #802 on: February 23, 2021, 10:12:58 PM »
Halberstadt C.V

The Halberstadt C.V was a German single-engined reconnaissance biplane of World War I.

The C.V was developed from the Halberstadt C.III, with a more powerful supercharged 220 hp Benz Bz.IVü engine, it saw service only in the final months of the war. Cameras were mounted in the observer's cockpit floor.
The aircraft had very good flight characteristics, manoeuvrability and rate of climb, and was among best German World War I aircraft in its class. The first aircraft appeared in front in late June 1918.
Armament consisted of a 7.92 mm (0.312 in) LMG 08/15 Spandau machine gun mounted in the forward fuselage, a 7.92 mm (0.312 in) Parabellum machine gun on a mounting in the rear cockpit, plus a small amount of bombs could also be carried.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2021, 11:10:22 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 12293
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #803 on: February 24, 2021, 11:26:29 PM »
Halberstadt CL.IV

The Halberstadt CL.IV was a German ground attack aircraft of World War I.

The CL.IV featured a shorter, strengthened fuselage and a larger horizontal stabilizer that of the earlier CL.II. These changes, along with a one-piece, horn-balanced elevator, gave the CL.IV much greater manoeuverability than its predecessor. After tests were completed of the prototype in April 1918, at least 450 were ordered from Halberstadt, and an additional 250 aircraft from a subcontractor, LFG (Roland), as Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol).The aircraft were powered by a 160hp Mercedes D.III 6-cylinder water-cooled in-line piston engine.

The Halberstadt CL.IV was one of the most effective ground attack aircraft of World War I, relying on its excellent handling to avoid ground fire. It appeared on the Western Front towards the end of the German offensives in 1918. Flights of up to six aircraft flew close support missions, at very low altitude, suppressing enemy infantry and artillery fire just ahead of the advancing German troops.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2021, 11:26:49 PM by Angry Turnip »

Offline Angry Turnip

  • Global Moderator
  • Marshal of the Air Force
  • *****
  • Posts: 12293
  • Gender: Male
  • Local Airport: BFS
  • Favourite Aircraft: Hawker Hunter/Harrier
  • A-P.net Photos: 1
Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #804 on: Yesterday at 01:53:29 PM »
Halberstadt D.II

The Halberstadt D.II was a biplane fighter aircraft from WW1.

The D.II was the production version of the experimental D.I. The main differences between the D.I and D.II included a major effort to lighten the aircraft to improve its performance; the latter also featured staggered wings and the adoption of a more powerful 120 hp Mercedes D.II engine. The radiators that had been tried in the D.I were replaced by a wing mounted radiator. In the D.I, the pilot sat higher in his cockpit, to improve his view over the top wing. This required a dorsal turtleback fairing over the rear fuselage, to improve its lines.

The D.II was considered to be very manoeuvrable in particular it could reputedly be dived safely at high speed. A single synchronised lMG 08 "Spandau" machine gun fired through the propeller arc. It earned the respect of Allied fighter pilots and was a preferred mount of pilots, until the Albatros D.I became available. Halberstadts were actually retained, or even returned to service by some pilots during the early weeks of 1917. The Halberstadt-built D-series fighters bore no marked IdFlieg-issued military serial numbers anywhere on their exteriors. The licence-built Aviatik and Hannover-constructed examples of the Halberstadt D-series fighters usually had IdFlieg-issued serial numbers on their rear fuselage sides.

Manfred von Richthofen flew a red Halberstadt D.II for a few weeks in February and March 1917, after the spar of the lower wing of his Albatros D.III cracked in combat. As the new Albatros fighters came into service the Halberstadts were quickly replaced, although a few survived into early 1917.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 01:55:31 PM by Angry Turnip »