Author Topic: The slightly less well known  (Read 134573 times)

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Offline Angry Turnip

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #875 on: April 30, 2021, 02:12:49 PM »
Fokker F.XXXVI

The Fokker F.XXXVI was a 1930s Dutch four-engined 32-passenger airliner.

It first flew on 22 June 1934 and was a high-wing cantilever monoplane with a fixed tailwheel landing gear. The wing was an all wood structure and the fuselage was fabric covered steel tube. It was powered by four 750hp Wright Cyclone radial piston engines mounted in the wing leading edge, and carried 4 crew and 32 passengers in four eight-seat cabins. In an unusual decision, engineers went to great length in soundproofing the passenger cabin. It was delivered to KLM and operated on European routes from March 1935.

Although it had a good payload its range was much less than and was structurally inferior to the new Douglas DC-2 and DC-3 and only one was built. KLM sold the aircraft in 1939 to Scottish Aviation for use as a crew and navigation trainer for the Royal Air Forces No.12 Elementary Flying Training School, which was operated by Scottish Aviation. It was scrapped in 1940 after it burnt out in a take-off accident.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2021, 02:13:28 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #876 on: May 01, 2021, 01:31:37 PM »
Fokker G.I

The Fokker G.I was a Dutch twin-engined heavy fighter aircraft from the late 1930`s.

The G.I was intended for the role of jachtkruiser, "heavy" fighter, able to gain air superiority over the battlefield as well as being a bomber destroyer.The Fokker G.I utilized a twin-engined, twin-boom layout that featured a central nacelle housing two or three crew members (a pilot, radio operator/navigator/rear gunner or a bombardier) as well as a formidable armament of twin 23 mm (.91 in) Madsen cannon and a pair of 7.9 mm (.31 in) machine guns (later eight machine guns) in the nose and one in a rear turret.the G.I was of mixed construction; the front of the central pod were built around a welded frame, covered with aluminium plating. The back of the central pod, however, as well as the wings, were completely constructed with wood.

The G.I prototype, powered by 650 hp Hispano-Suiza 14AB-02/03 engines, had its first flight at Welschap Airfield, near Eindhoven on 16 March 1937.The maiden flight went well, but a subsequent test flight in September 1937 ended with a supercharger explosion that nearly caused the loss of the prototype. The accident prompted a replacement of the Hispano-Suiza engines with 750 hp Pratt & Whitney SB4-G Twin Wasp Junior engines.

Flight tests revealed that the G.1 was capable of diving at over 400 mph and demonstrated aerobatic capabilities.Orders for G.1 Wasp aircraft came from Spain (26 ordered) and Sweden (18), while the Mercury variant was ordered by Denmark (12) together with a production license that never came to be used,[7] and Sweden (72). Although Belgium, Finland, Turkey, Hungary and Switzerland air forces showed great interest, they did not place firm orders.

The Dutch ordered 36 G.I's with 825 hp Bristol Mercury VIII engines, the standard engine used by the Dutch Air Force in the Fokker D.XXI fighter, in order to equip two squadrons. Only the first four examples were built as three-seaters intended for ground-attack, with the remainder being completed as two-seat fighters. During the lead-up to hostilities, a total of 26 G.I's were operational at Rotterdam (Waalhaven Airfield), and at Bergen near Alkmaar. The aircraft were actively involved in border patrols and in order to ensure neutrality.

On 10 May 1940, when Germany invaded the Netherlands, 23 G.1 aircraft were serviceable while production of Spain's order of the G.1 Wasp variant continued with a dozen aircraft completed, awaiting armament.
The German invasion started with an early morning Luftwaffe attack on the Dutch airfields. While the 4th JaVA received a devastating blow, losing all but one of its aircraft, eight 3rd JaVA G.1 fighters of the Waalhaven airbase in Rotterdam, that were already fully fuelled and armed, scrambled in time and successfully engaged several German aircraft. The surviving aircraft continued to fly, but with mounting losses, bringing their numbers down to three airworthy aircraft by the end of the first day.In the "Five-day War", the available G.1 fighters were mainly deployed in ground attack missions, strafing advancing German infantry units, but also used to attack Junkers Ju 52/3m transports.

There are no surviving G.Is today, although a replica has been built and is on display at the National Military Museum.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2021, 01:34:27 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #877 on: May 01, 2021, 01:46:48 PM »
Fokker D.XXIII

The Fokker D.XXIII was designed as a twin-engined single-seat aircraft. To overcome the problems of asymmetric flight it had a tractor engine at the front and a pusher engine at the rear. The D.XXIII was a cantilever monoplane with the twin tail units on booms. The pilot had an enclosed cockpit in between the tractor and pusher engines and it had a retractable tricycle landing gear.

The prototype first flew on 30 May 1939 powered by two 530hp Walter Sagitta I-SR air cooled vee piston engines. The trial flights identified problems with the cooling of the rear engine and general engine performance. It was proposed to use Rolls-Royce or Daimler-Benz engines in the production aircraft.Concerns were also raised about the pilot clearing the rear propeller if he had to bail out and an ejector seat was considered. As a provisional solution, rails were put on both sides of the forward fuselage for the Fokker test pilot, to use to bail out in an emergency. The aircraft was flown 11 times for a total flight time of less than four hours. The rear fuselage paneling was modified significantly before the last few flights in an attempt to address chronic rear engine cooling problems. On the 11th flight in April, the undercarriage was damaged, and the programme was abandoned in May 1940 when the German forces invaded the Netherlands.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2021, 01:48:50 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #878 on: May 02, 2021, 07:12:14 PM »
Fokker F.IV

The Fokker F.IV was an airliner designed in the Netherlands in the early 1920s.

The Fokker F.IV was constructed as a high-wing cantilever monoplane with fixed tailskid undercarriage. The pilot sat in an open cockpit alongside the engine in the manner of the Fokker F.III, while a cabin inside the fuselage could seat 12 passengers. Before the aircraft had even been built, the United States Army Air Service had bought two examples during a promotional visit to the country. Built at Fokker's factory at Veere and flight-tested by Anthony Fokker himself, the two aircraft were crated and shipped to the United States where they were assembled at McCook Field and given the designation T-2. Despite Fokker's hopes that increasing airline passenger numbers would create interest in aircraft of larger seating capacity, the F.IV was too large for the needs of contemporary airlines, and no further aircraft were sold.

One of the T-2s was used for a number of long-distance flights over the next few years, culminating in the first nonstop transcontinental flight across the United States, an idea that originated with Lt Oakley G. Kelly, one of the T-2's test pilots.Their aircraft is preserved in the National Air and Space Museum.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2021, 11:29:10 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #879 on: May 02, 2021, 11:22:31 PM »
Fokker F-32

The Fokker F-32 was a passenger aircraft built by the Fokker Aircraft Corporation of America in 1929.

The aircraft first flew on Sept 13th 1929,it later crashed on November 27, 1929, during a demonstration of a three-engined takeoff from Roosevelt Field on Long Island, New York. One of the two port engines was stopped, but the other failed shortly after takeoff, causing a loss of control. The aircraft came down on a house in nearby Carle Place, and was totally destroyed in the crash and subsequent fire. Nobody was killed, although the pilot and a passenger were injured.

The crash displayed the F-32's most notable problem; it was underpowered, which was made worse by the aircraft's back-to-back engine configuration, with an engine on each end of the underwing nacelles. The front engine powered a two-bladed propeller and the rear engine a three-bladed one. The aft propellers, working in the disturbed air from the front, were inefficient, and the rear engines often suffered from cooling problems. The power problem was partially solved by replacing the prototype's Pratt & Whitney Wasp engines with more powerful 575hp Pratt & Whitney R-1860 Hornet Bs on later production aircraft, but the other issues remained throughout their short service lives.

Western Air Express and Universal Air Lines each ordered five aircraft, and there was interest from other airlines, including KLM (Royal Dutch Airlines). However, despite the painting of a prototype for Universal, they cancelled their order, and WAE only picked up two instead of the planned five, largely because of the Great Depression.
Western Air Express were the only purchasers of the F-32, buying two of them.They operated out of Alhambra Airport in Alhambra, California and later Grand Central Air Terminal in Glendale, California and other West Coast destinations.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2021, 11:23:11 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #880 on: May 02, 2021, 11:35:22 PM »
Fokker F.25

The Fokker F.25 Promotor was a single-engined, twin-boomed, four-passenger monoplane.

It was of wooden construction and was fitted with a retractable nosewheel undercarriage. One feature of the design was that instead of a 2 + 2 seating, the pilot sat in front to the left, and all three passengers were on a bench seat to the rear of him. Alternatively, when being used as an air ambulance aircraft, it could carry a patient on a stretcher, which was loaded through a hatch in the aircraft's nose.
The F.25 was based upon the design of the Difoga 421 aircraft, home-built and -designed during World War II by Frits Diepen, a Ford garage owner from Tilburg, the Netherlands. His intention was to create an easy to fly personal aircraft. Due to the war an aircraft engine was not available and instead it used a Ford V-8.Later a 190hp Lycoming O-435-A 6-cylinder air-cooled horizontally-opposed piston engine was used.

20 F.25 aircraft were built, but sales were disappointing as it could not compete in cost with thousands of war surplus aircraft on the market.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2021, 11:36:44 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #881 on: May 03, 2021, 03:10:40 PM »
Fokker S.14 Machtrainer

The Fokker S.14 Machtrainer is a Dutch two-seater military training jet aircraft.

Development began in the late 1940s at the request of British engine manufacturer Rolls-Royce, who were looking for a manufacturer to produce a new trainer aircraft powered by their Derwent turbojet engine. Fokker submited a design for an aircraft, designating it the S.14 Machtrainer. On 19 May 1951, the prototype first flew powered by a Derment V engine.Having secured an order from the Royal Netherlands Air Force for 20 aircraft with a Derwent 8 powerplant, the Machtrainer entered service with the service during 1955.

The S.14 Machtrainer was a low-winged monoplane,featuring all-metal construction, aside from the engine compartment, it is almost exclusively composed of lightweight alloys.The design and size of the wing allowed for the aircraft to land at much lower speeds than contemporary jet aircraft of the era. Furthermore, a total of three pneumatically-actuated door-type air brakes were fitted to the rear fuselage.It was also provisioned with a retractable tricycle undercarriage, which was pneumatically-operated; the main wheels were fitted with shock absorbers. The main assemblies of the undercarriage retracted inwards into the wing's center section, while the nosewheel retracted forwards into a recess within the nose's underside.

The crew of two were seated in a side-by-side arrangement within a relatively spacious cockpit. There was sufficient room to allow for a third crew member if required, although this capability would necessitate the deletion of the radio or radar equipment that could otherwise be installed in this location.Primary controls, such as the throttle and air brakes, are duplicated; many of the controls are positioned on a central pedestal. Both crew were provided with Martin-Baker-built ejection seats.

Only 19 of the 20 aircraft ordered by the Netherlands Air Force entered service, one was destroyed in a fatal crash in the United States while being used by Fokker as a demonstrator prior to delivery. The S.14 fleet was in use for over a decade, during which a second aircraft was lost in a fatal crash in 1964.
Three still exist today including the original prototype (K-1, PH-XIV), which was operated by the Nationaal Lucht en Ruimvaart Laboratorium (NLL), located at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport, until retirement in March 1966. It was then displayed at the Aviodome museum at Schiphol before moving to the museum at Lelystad Airport by 2008.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2021, 03:15:35 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #882 on: May 04, 2021, 09:36:20 PM »
Now on to Belgium.....

ACAZ T.2

The ACAZ T.1 and T.2, very similar to each other, were the first Belgian all-metal aircraft.

The first example of ACAZ's all-metal two-seater tourer, was first flown in early 1924. It was the first Belgian all-metal aircraft and its trials went well.On 21 June it was flown to Brussels to take part in the Concours des avions de tourisme (touring aircraft contest) but in low cloud it collided with a tree and crashed but no lives were lost.
The T.1 and T.2 were designed by Alfred Renard and Emile Allard. Each had a thick profile, two part, cantilever, high wing which could be detached for transport. The wing was basically rectangular but with rounded leading edges at the tips.

The engine was a 70 hp Anzani 6, a six-cylinder radial engine mounted uncowled on the nose with its fuel tank behind a firewall. The fuselage was rectangular in cross-section apart from a slightly shaped roof and was built around frames and longerons with sheet metal covering. The enclosed cabin, which held two sitting side-by-side, was under the wing and had both forward and side glazing. The fuselage frame in the cabin region was strengthened; access was via a side door. It had a conventional tailplane of the same plan as the wings, mounted on top of the fuselage. No more T.2s were built.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2021, 09:38:02 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #883 on: May 07, 2021, 04:21:37 PM »
Avions Fairey

Avions Fairey was the Belgian-based subsidiary of the British Fairey Aviation that built aircraft for the Belgian government.

In the late 1920s, the Belgian Air Force set out to replace its old aircraft. Belgian officers attended the Hendon Air Display where they saw a Fairey Firefly and met Fairey staff. The Firefly toured Belgian air bases in 1930 and met with approval from pilots. This led to a contract for 12 UK-built Firefly II to be followed by a further 33 aircraft built in Belgium.
Fairey had a number of Belgians in key roles in the company; Ernest Oscar Tips and Marcel Lobelle had joined during the First World War. Tips went to Belgium to set up the subsidiary company. He based the new company near Charleroi.Avions Fairey received further orders for Fireflies followed by Fairey Foxes which would be the main aircraft of the Belgian Air Force; being used as a fighter, bomber and training aircraft.

Ernest O. Tips designed a number of light civil aircraft at Avions Fairey; the "Tipsy" family of aircraft. After the 1933 16 hp Tipsy, came the S2 with a more powerful 32 hp engine. The Tipsy B was a side-by-side seat training aircraft. A tandem trainer was the Tipsy M designed for the Belgian Air Force but overlooked for the SV4b. Tipsy series was successful and licence rights for production were sold in the UK and South Africa.

After the war, Avions Fairey restarted at Gosselies airfield near Charleroi by servicing C-47 Skytrains of the Air Force; this was then extended to other aircraft.In 1953, Avions Fairey was contracted to produce 256 Hawker Hunter fuselages for the Dutch and Belgian air Force. This lasted until 1958. Avions Fairey continued in service contracts and, in conjunction with SABCA, built Lockheed F-104 Starfighters under licence from 1962.On 1 June 1976, the SONACA company was created from Avions Fairey.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2021, 04:31:54 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #884 on: May 08, 2021, 02:47:26 PM »
Stampe et Vertongen RSV.22

The Stampe et Vertongen RSV.22 was a training biplane from the 1920s.

The RSV.22 was a single-bay biplane with staggered wings of unequal span,braced with N-struts near their tips.The fixed undercarriage consisted of two mainwheels that were joined by a common through axle, plus a tailskid.The student pilot and the instructor sat in tandem open cockpits that were fitted with dual controls. Construction was of mixed materials, with metal used for the undercarriage, engine mount, and cabane struts.The control surfaces were operated by a rigid linkage made of dural tube.

The horizontal stabilizer was adjustable in flight, using a lever in the cockpit to adjust the aircraft's trim.The base model RSV 22/180 was powered by a 180-hp Hispano-Suiza engine, but the aircraft was capable of using powerplants of up to 300 hp. The RSV 22/200 variant used a 200-hp Renard-built radial engine in place of the Hispano-Suiza.The Belgian Air Force purchased 20 examples of the RSV 22/180.

I am going to leave European manufactures for a while, and have a look at Asia.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2021, 10:03:13 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #885 on: May 10, 2021, 10:17:24 PM »
First up is Japan....

Aichi AB-3

The Aichi AB-3 was a Japanese ship-board reconnaissance floatplane of the 1930s.

In 1928, the Republic of China Navy, keen to modernise its obsolete fleet, placed orders for a class of two light cruisers, the Ning Hai class, to be designed in Japan.The ships were designed to carry two seaplanes each, with a small hangar being provided for a folded aircraft, and the Japanese Navy placed an order with Aichi for a single seat floatplane to equip the ships.

The design on was based on the earlier Aichi AB-2 two seat floatplane which was under design for the Imperial Japanese Navy, producing a small single-seat biplane of mixed wood and metal construction with single-bay wings, powered by a 130 hp Gasuden Jimpu radial engine. It had twin floats, and had detachable wings to aid storage aboard ship.The prototype AB-3 was completed in January 1932, and when flown for the first time in February that year proved to have excellent performance.The prototype was accepted by the Chinese navy, but no further production ensued, the Chinese instead building a similar aircraft of local design.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2021, 10:19:17 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #886 on: May 10, 2021, 10:28:18 PM »
Aichi E10A

The Aichi E10A was a Japanese night reconnaissance flying boat of the 1930s.

In 1934, the Imperial Japanese Navy drew up a specification for a new night reconnaissance aircraft, intended to shadow enemy fleets during the cover of darkness, with orders being placed with Aichi and with Kawanishi.Aichi's design, with the company designation AB-12, was a single-engined biplane flying boat of all-metal construction. Its two-bay wings folded rearwards to save space, while its crew of three were accommodated in an enclosed cabin. It was powered by a 500hp pusher water-cooled Aichi Type 91 engine, driving a four-blade wooden propeller.

The first prototype flew in December 1934,and was found to have superior stability to the competing Kawanishi E10K, and so was ordered into production.It entered service in August 1936 with the Japanese Navy as the designation E10A. Fifteen aircraft were built, remaining in service until 1941, being phased out before the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2021, 10:29:45 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #887 on: May 14, 2021, 09:34:47 AM »
Aichi H9A

The Aichi H9A was an Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service flying boat.

The H9A was a twin-engined, parasol-wing flying boat, and was designed in response to an Imperial Japanese Navy requirement for an advanced seaplane trainer for future crew members of the four-engined Kawanishi H8K "Emily" flying boat. Design work started in January 1940 and the first of three prototypes was flown in September 1940.
The aircraft had a normal crew of five (pilot, co-pilot, observer, flight engineer and a radio-operator) but seating was provided for an additional three pupil crew members. From 1942  the Aichi H9A was deployed in a variety of second-line roles, including anti-submarine missions along the Japanese coasts, transport, paratroop training and liaison.
The aircraft was built in fairly small numbers with around 30 produced.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2021, 09:35:19 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #888 on: May 14, 2021, 09:54:30 AM »
Aichi B7A

The Aichi B7A Ryusei was a carrier-borne torpedo-dive bomber from 1942.

It was intended for use aboard a new generation of Taihō-class carriers, the first of which was laid down in July 1941. Because the deck elevators on the Taihōs had a larger square area than those of older Japanese carriers, the longstanding maximum limit of 11 m (36 ft) on carrier aircraft length could now be lifted.
The designers chose a mid-wing arrangement for the B7A to provide for an internal bomb-bay and to ensure enough clearance for the plane's 3.5 m (11 ft) four-bladed propeller. This required an inverted gull wing, to shorten the length of the main landing gear. The wing featured extendable ailerons with a ten-degree range of deflection, enabling them to act as auxiliary flaps. Dive brakes were fitted underneath just outboard of the fuselage. The B7A's outer wing panels were designed to fold upwards hydraulically for carrier stowage.

The powerplant was dictated by the Japanese Navy which demanded that Aichi design the aircraft around the 1,825 hp Nakajima NK9C Homare 12 18-cylinder two-row air-cooled radial engine. One production model B7A2 was later fitted with a 2,000 hp Nakajima Homare 23 radial engine.Armament consisted of two 20mm Type 99 Model 2 cannons in the wing roots and one flexible 7.92mm Type 1 machine-gun mounted in the rear cockpit. Later production models of the B7A2 featured a 13mm Type 2 machine-gun in place of the 7.92mm gun. Despite the plane's weight and size, it displayed fighter-like handling and performance it was fast and highly maneuverable.

The photo shows a captured version with US markings.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2021, 09:55:50 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #889 on: May 16, 2021, 09:07:32 PM »
Hiro G2H

The Hiro G2H was a 1930s Japanese bomber or reconnaissance monoplane.

The Hiro G2H1 was one of the first long-range land-based bomber/reconnaissance aircraft designed and built for the Imperial Japanese Navy. The prototype appeared in 1933 but suffered from structural weakness. The aircraft was a low-wing, cantilever monoplane powered by two 1,180 hp Type 94 piston engines.
The aircraft struggled with the unreliability of the engines, and only eight aircraft were built. The development of the aircraft was costly in both manpower and finance and the aircraft did not live up to expectations and only eight were built.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2021, 09:08:07 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #890 on: May 18, 2021, 08:25:35 PM »
Hiro H2H

The Hiro H2H, or Navy Type 89 was a Japanese patrol flying boat of the 1930s.

The Imperial Japanese Navy purchased a single example of the British Supermarine Southampton II metal-hulled flying boat in 1929 Following studies and evaluation Hiro designed a new flying boat, based on the Southampton.

The new flying boat was a twin-engined biplane, with an all-metal hull, and fabric covered metal wing and tail structures. It was powered by two 550 hp Hiro Type 14 water-cooled 12-cylinders W engines. The first prototype was completed in 1930, and following successful testing, it was ordered into production, with 13 aircraft being built by Hiro and a further four by Aichi. Later aircraft were powered by more powerful (600-750 hp Hiro Type 90 engines.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2021, 08:25:59 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #891 on: May 18, 2021, 08:42:19 PM »
Kawanishi K-11

The Kawanishi K-11 was a 1920s Japanese single-seat carrier fighter.

The K-11 was a private venture to meet a 1926 Imperial Japanese Navy requirement for a single-seat carrier fighter to replace the Mitsubishi 1MF, competing against officially sponsored designs from Aichi , Mitsubishi, and Nakajima. The K-11 Experimental Carrier Fighter was an equal-span biplane with a conventional landing gear and powered by 500 hp  BMW inline engine. It had a metal fuselage with fabric covering and wooden wings.

The first prototype made its maiden flight in July 1927, with a second prototype, with a slightly modified fuselage and revised tail design, it was built in 1928. The type was not accepted by the Navy, however, with the Nakajima design being selected, entering production as the A1N. The two K-11s were used by Kawanishi as a liaison aircraft.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2021, 08:42:47 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #892 on: May 21, 2021, 02:49:37 PM »
Kawanishi E5K

The Kawanishi E5K1 or Kawanishi Type G was a large 1930s three-seat reconnaissance floatplane.

The E5K1, a radial-engined twin-float seaplane that first flew in October 1931, but due to persistent problems in development only a limited number were built. It entered service with the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service in April 1932 as the Kawanishi Navy Type 90-3 Reconnaissance Seaplane.The E5K1 was a production version with a 450 hp Bristol Jupiter radial engine; 20 production aircraft were built.Two pre-production Type-14-2 Kai-1-Ds, powered by the Bristol Jupiter were built by Kawanishi under the company name Kawanishi Type G.

Seventeen production aircraft were built as the Kawanishi Navy Type 90-3 Reconnaissance Seaplane (E5K1).The E5K saw action during the Shanghai Incident from 28 January 3 March 1932. The Japanese seaplane tender Kamoi carried a complement of 12 E5Y aircraft.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2021, 02:50:35 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #893 on: May 21, 2021, 03:26:22 PM »
Kawanishi H8K

The Kawanishi H8K was a flying boat used by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service during World War II for maritime patrol duties.

The Kawanishi H8K was a large, four-engine aircraft designed for long range and endurance on patrols or bombing missions typically flown alone over the ocean. The prototype first flew in January 1941, and H8K1s made their first combat sortie in March 1942. The robust H8K2 "Emily" flying boat was also fitted with powerful defensive armament, which Allied pilots had substantial respect for wherever this aircraft was encountered.

Despite this, initial development was troublesome, with the prototype displaying terrible handling on the water. Modification of the hull, redesigning of the planing bottom and the addition of spray strips under the nose eased the water handling problems.Two further prototypes joined the development program in December 1941.The H8K2 was an upgrade over the H8K1 with more powerful engines, slightly revised armament, and an increase in fuel capacity. This was to be the main variant, with 112 produced.

The H8K entered production in 1941 and first saw operational use on the 4th March 1942 in a second raid on Pearl Harbor. Since the target lay out of range for the flying boats, this ambitious plan involved a refuelling by submarine.Two planes from the Yokohama Kōkūtai (Naval Air Corps) attempted to bomb Pearl Harbor but, due to poor weather and visibility, did not accomplish any significant damage.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2021, 03:30:00 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #894 on: May 23, 2021, 12:17:25 AM »
Kyushu K10W

The Kyushu K10W was a single engine low wing fixed undercarriage monoplane trainer.

It was designed by the Kyushu Aircraft Company mid 1939 which required a design similar to the North American NA-16.Work commenced in January 1940 and the first prototype was ready by April 1941. It suffered from stall and stability problems that resulted in 16 pre-production testing aircraft being built. Kyushu would build only nine production aircraft before production was transferred in 1943 to Nippon Hikoki (a small subcontractor ), who in turn built 150 examples before production ended in August 1944.

The K10W1 was of flush riveted stressed skin construction throughout (excepting the fabric covered control surfaces) with a vaguely similar configuration to the NA-16. The controls were run internally, and footrests retracted rather than being fixed. A version of the K10W built from wood was planned as the K10W2 but was never built.The K10W1 was not popular with crews possibly due to ongoing handling problems and only served with a small number of units. A small number were used as target tugs for gunnery training and as unit liason attached to operational bases.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2021, 12:18:05 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #895 on: May 23, 2021, 12:31:19 AM »
Kyushu Q1W

The Kyūshū Q1W Tokai was a land-based anti-submarine patrol bomber.

It was similar in appearance to the German Junkers Ju 88 medium bomber, the Q1W was a much smaller aircraft with significantly different design details. The first test flight took place in September 1943. It entered service in January 1945. The Q1W carried two low-power engines,  Hitachi GK2 Amakaze 31 9-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines of 610 hp each allowing for long periods of low-speed flight.

Kyūshū also built the K11W1 Shiragiku, a bomber training plane and the Q3W1 Nankai (South Sea), a specialized antisubmarine version of the K11W. The latter was of all-wood construction and was destroyed during a landing accident on its first flight.In total 153 aircraft were completed by the end of WW2.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2021, 12:31:58 AM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #896 on: May 26, 2021, 10:32:26 PM »
Manshū Hayabusa

The Manshū MT-1 Hayabusa  "Peregrine Falcon" was an airliner produced by the Japanese Manchuria Airplane Manufacturing Company in Manchukuo in the late 1930s.

It was a conventional, low-wing cantilever monoplane with fixed tailwheel undercarriage. It was powered by a 460hp Nakajima Kotobuki 2-kai-1 nine-cylinder air-cooled radial engine. The flight deck was enclosed and separate from the passenger cabin, which could seat six people. The type equipped Manchukuo National Airways, and approx 50 were built.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2021, 10:33:09 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #897 on: May 28, 2021, 04:37:33 PM »
Mitsubishi 1MF

The Mitsubishi 1MF was a Japanese carrier fighter aircraft of the 1920s.

The Japanese shipbuilding company Mitsubishi Shipbuilding and Engineering Co Ltd set up a subsidiary company, to produce aircraft, it hired Herbert Smith, formerly of the Sopwith Aviation Company to assist the design of the aircraft, Smith bringing to Japan Jack Hyland and a team of six other British engineers.The fighter designed by Smith and his team, designated the 1MF by Mitsubishi, and known as the Navy Type 10 Carrier Fighter by the Japanese Navy  first flew in October 1921.

The 1MF was a single-seat, single-bay biplane with unequal-span wings and all-wooden construction, powered by a 300 hp Hispano-Suiza 8 engine (built under license as the Mitsubishi Hi engine). It was fitted with claw-type arrestor gear for use with British-style arrestor cables. Following a successful flight programme, the aircraft was accepted by the Japanese Navy as a standard fighter, with 138 of various versions being built, production continuing until 1928.

A 1MF aircraft became the first aircraft to take-off from and land on Japan's new aircraft carrier Hōshō on 28 February 1923.The 1MF series proved a tough and dependable aircraft, operating from the carriers Akagi and Kaga - as well as from Hōshō - when they entered service in 1927 and 1928 respectively. It continued in service until 1930.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2021, 04:40:08 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #898 on: May 28, 2021, 04:53:51 PM »
Mitsubishi 1MT

The Mitsubishi 1MT was a Japanese single-seat triplane torpedo bomber.

The aircraft was designed by Herbert Smith it was intended for use aboard the Japanese aircraft carrier Hōshō.The 1MT1N flew for the first time in August 1922 and it entered service as the Navy Type 10 Torpedo Bomber or Carrier Attacker. 20 aircraft were built, powered by a single 450hp Napier Lion engine.
Performance but the aircraft was difficult to fly and unable to operate from an aircraft carrier when carrying a torpedo. The type was soon withdrawn and scrapped.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2021, 04:54:17 PM by Angry Turnip »

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Re: The slightly less well known
« Reply #899 on: May 28, 2021, 05:03:45 PM »
Mitsubishi 2MB1

The Mitsubishi 2MB1 was a light bomber from the mid-1920s to equip the Imperial Japanese Army.

It was developed in parallel to the 2MB2, but the 2MB1 was a more conservative approach based closely on the 2MT carrier-based torpedo bomber that was already in production for the Imperial Japanese Navy. Like the 2MT, the 2MB1 was a conventional two-bay biplane with open cockpits in tandem and fixed tailskid undercarriage. The 2MT's Napier engine and side-mounted radiators were exchanged for a 450 hp Hispano-Suiza engine and frontal radiator, and specific naval features such as folding wings were no longer fitted.

The type saw action in the early stages of Japan's Invasion of Manchuria in 1931, but it was found to be slow and vulnerable to fighters, thus it was soon redeployed to training duties.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2021, 05:04:13 PM by Angry Turnip »